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Are investors pumping up another housing bubble in Florida?

Image of Are investors pumping up another housing bubble in Florida?
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Since Florida's housing market crashed nearly a decade ago, a wave of investors offering cash to flip or rent properties has helped restore market values. Now, some homeowners who suffered foreclosure but are ready again to qualify are being priced out while rental prices rise, adding to concerns about another housing bubble. Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports. Continue


Picturing Kodak’s transformation in the digital age

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


Eastman Kodak was once one of the nation’s leading companies, but since the rise of digital technology, the photographic film company has been forced to downsize and find alternative ways to make profits. A short documentary by The New York Times looks at how the company has changed. Continue


TTC Extra: SXSW Panel Interruption

Image of TTC Extra: SXSW Panel Interruption
To The Contrary
PBS


The lack of diversity in the tech field was awkwardly displayed at the South By South West festival. Google Chairman Eric Schmidt was called out for repeatedly interrupting former Google executive Megan Smith. PANEL: Kellyanne Conway; Neera Tanden; Erin Matson; Rina Shah Continue


News Wrap: Fed opens possibility of interest rate hike

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


In our news wrap Wednesday, the Federal Reserve said it was open to raising interest rates, but the job market must improve and inflation has to move closer to 2 percent for a rate hike. Also, gunmen attacked Tunisia’s National Bordo Museum, killing more than 20, most of whom were Western European tourists. Two of the gunmen were killed, but two or three others escaped, according to officials. Continue


A Bloody Labor Battle

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American Experience
PBS


In June 1892, workers at the Andrew Carnegie-owned steel plant in Homestead, Pennsylvania went on strike. When plant manager Henry Clay Frick hired 300 armed guards to attack strikers, the resulting battle ended in deaths on both sides. Continue


Why good economic news spooked markets this week

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


Anxiety over interest rates, the dollar and falling oil prices drove volatility in the financial markets this week; even good news seemed to upset investors. Judy Woodruff talks to Mark Vitner of Wells Fargo about what’s causing the turmoil and what it says about the global economy. Continue


Winter weather adds stress for Boston's struggling workers

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


In Boston, brutal winter weather shuttered schools, offices and businesses for days at a time. While some may have welcomed the snow days, some hourly workers faced the choice between giving up a day of wages or making the grueling, even dangerous, commute. Special correspondent Rick Karr reports. Continue


How new rules could protect you from credit errors

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


In the past, the way credit rating agencies reviewed disputes or errors frequently hurt consumers. The nation’s three largest credit rating agencies have negotiated with the state of New York to change their review process, and to wait longer before posting unpaid medical debts. Judy Woodruff learns more from New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman. Continue


Why workers’ comp isn’t working for many who need it

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


Workers’ compensation benefits have played a critical role in the American labor market by allowing businesses to pay for medical costs and wages if an employee is injured on the job. But a new investigation has found that more than 30 states have passed laws reducing these benefits. Judy Woodruff learns more about the impact from Michael Grabell of ProPublica and Howard Berkes of NPR. Continue


Women World Leaders: Interviews with Women in Power

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To The Contrary
PBS


Some To The Contrary Classics: interviews with women who have attained the highest office in their countries. We speak with Benazir Bhutto of Pakistan, Helen Clark of New Zealand, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf of Liberia, Janet Jagan of Guyana, and Gro Harlem Brundtland of Norway. Continue


Judge Steven W. Rhodes

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Tavis Smiley
PBS


The judge who presided over the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history describes how he handled the proceedings, and shares his own feelings about the city of Detroit. Continue


Beijing+20; Hillary Clinton Doctrine; "War on Women" Over?

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To The Contrary
PBS


Beijing+20: How far have women come and what still needs to be done, 20 years after the famed women's conference? Hillary Clinton Doctrine: How much has Hillary Clinton done to improve women's lives? "War on Women": Democrats say it's back, while Republicans say it's over. PANEL: Kellyanne Conway; Neera Tanden; Erin Matson; Rina Shah Continue


Gwen's Take: Making Peace and Making Coffee

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Washington Week
PBS


"I woke up one morning this week to discover that Starbucks had decided to launch a new initiative at its coffee shops, branding their paper cups with a #RaceTogether hashtag and encouraging baristas to chat customers up about race. My first thought: what an admirable idea. My second thought: heck no." Continue


Thriving, affordable Twin Cities have racial inequality gap

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


In the United States, the best cities for making a living are usually the least affordable. Minneapolis-St. Paul has been an exception, thanks in part to progressive laws on education, tax sharing and housing. But even in the Twin Cities, there’s a sharp racial inequality gap. Judy Woodruff interviews writer Derek Thompson as part of a collaboration between The Atlantic and the PBS NewsHour. Continue


What House Republicans hope 2016’s budget will look like

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


House Republicans revealed their 2016 budget plan, pushing for deep cuts to lower the deficit, while preserving defense spending. What are the political calculations behind the proposal? Political editor Lisa Desjardins joins Gwen Ifill for a look at the priorities fueling the GOP budget. Continue


Coding academies offer fast track to good jobs

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


Economics correspondent Paul Solman visits New York's Flatiron School, one of numerous coding bootcamps online and around the country that are designed to help graduates land jobs in a high-demand industry. Continue


Beijing+20: Coverage of Original UN Conference on Women

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To The Contrary
PBS


It's been 20 years since the Fourth UN World Conference on Women's rights in Beijing. To commemorate this landmark, To The Contrary presents our coverage of the 1995 conference. Continue


Job gains continue, so why are wages stubbornly stagnant?

Image of Job gains continue, so why are wages stubbornly stagnant?
PBS NewsHour
PBS


February’s labor report came in with stronger growth than expected, with 295,000 jobs added last month and the lowest unemployment rate since the 2008 financial crisis. But wage growth continues to lag, with hourly earning rising just one tenth of a percent. Secretary of Labor Thomas Perez analyzes the numbers with Judy Woodruff. Continue


Get ready for another round of the foreclosure crisis

Image of Get ready for another round of the foreclosure crisis
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Despite what you might have heard, the foreclosure crisis is far from over. Economics correspondent Paul Solman talks to people in Florida who have lost their homes, and considers whether a wave of new foreclosures is on the horizon. Continue


Tricks and tips for getting the most from Social Security

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


The longer you wait before cashing in on Social Security benefits, the greater the financial reward. But many don’t wait until age 70. There’s a range of loopholes and “secrets” that can improve your benefits, a fact economics correspondent Paul Solman discovered during a tennis game with friend and Social Security expert Larry Kotlikoff. Their new book, “Get What’s Yours,” shares that knowledge. Continue


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