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Teens take HIV epidemic into their own hands

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


Holli Reynolds “didn’t even know what HIV was” when the news broke that 11 people in her tiny town had tested positive for the virus that causes AIDS. “I was like, ‘Well, we’re going to have to do something about it so everyone’s aware of what’s going on around them. Because you’re living in it,” Holli said. Continue


Get excited for the 2015 Healthy Lunchtime Challenge

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Healthy Eating
PBS


Join First Lady Michelle Obama and kid chefs from around the country for the 2015 Healthy Lunchtime Challenge and Kids' "State Dinner." Learn more and submit a recipe at pbs.org/lunchtimechallenge. Continue


TTC Extra: Abstinence-Only Class

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To The Contrary
PBS


A professor's tweets went viral recently after expressing disappointment in her high school's son's abstinence-only sexual education program. Continue


Environmental Activist Erin Brockovich

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Tavis Smiley
PBS


The renowned environmental activist unpacks a troubling new bill that makes it easier for companies to bring untested chemical products into the marketplace. Continue


African American Studies Scholar Darnell Hunt

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Tavis Smiley
PBS


The Emmy winning actress talks about her latest film, "I'll See You In My Dreams," and discusses her work with the Oral Cancer Foundation. Continue


Chronicling the 'resistance movement' against cancer

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


We have to know the story of cancer, says Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee, because everyone comes in contact with the disease at some point in life. "Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies," a new PBS documentary, offers a deep examination of cancer medicine, with signs of hope for the future. Judy Woodruff interviews Mukherjee, author of the book that inspired the series, and executive producer Ken Burns. Continue


Finding the Achilles Heel

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Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies
PBS


This episode starts at a moment of optimism: Scientists believe they have cracked the mystery of the malignant cell, and the first targeted therapies have been developed. But very quickly cancer reveals new layers of complexity and a formidable array of defenses. Many call for a new focus on prevention and early detection as the most promising fronts in the war on cancer. Continue


The Medicaid bill that doesn't go away when you die

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


Medicaid is thought of as free health insurance for the poor, but federal law requires that recipients pay for the costs of long-term care. And when patients die, Medicaid charges the expenses to the leftover assets in their estates, sometimes passing the burden on to heirs. Special correspondent Sally Schilling reports on how California is debating the rule. Continue


A disputed diagnosis that sends parents to prison for abuse

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


For decades, when a child appeared in an emergency room with certain symptoms, including bleeding behind the eyes and bleeding around the brain, many doctors assumed violent shaking to be the cause. But in recent years, the Shaken Baby Syndrome diagnosis has come under intense scrutiny, and so have many of the resulting prosecutions and convictions. Special correspondent Jackie Judd reports. Continue


Study raises questions about value of breast cancer biopsies

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


Breast biopsies are good for accurately diagnosing invasive cancerous cells, but are less accurate when it comes to finding other abnormalities, according to a new study. This means many women may receive unnecessarily aggressive treatment. Hari Sreenivasan learns more about the findings from lead author Dr. Joann Elmore of the University of Washington. Continue


AfroPoP l The Carrier

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AfroPop
PBS


This lyrical film follows Mutinta Mweemba, a 28-year-old subsistence farmer living in a polygamous marriage. After learning she is HIV positive and pregnant, Mutinta sets out to keep her unborn child virus-free and to break the cycle of transmission. Continue


Vatican & Nuns; Reddit & The Wage Gap; Stay-at-Home Moms

Image of Vatican & Nuns; Reddit & The Wage Gap; Stay-at-Home Moms
To The Contrary
PBS


Vatican & Nuns: The Vatican cut short its investigation of the largest order of American nuns. Reddit & The Wage Gap: Interim CEO Ellen Pao bans salary negotiations for entry-level positions in an attempt to level the playing field. Stay-at-Home Moms: Is motherhood a career? PANEL: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), Genevieve Wood, Avis Jones-DeWeever, Mercedes Viana Schlapp Continue


"Outbreak" - Preview

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FRONTLINE
PBS


"Ebola was not an exception. Ebola is a precedent." Coming May 5 on FRONTLINE: The vivid, inside story of why the Ebola outbreak wasn't stopped before it was too late. Learn more and check local listings at pbs.org/frontline. Continue


Actress Blythe Danner

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Tavis Smiley
PBS


The Emmy winning actress talks about her latest film, "I'll See You In My Dreams," and discusses her work with the Oral Cancer Foundation. Continue


Coming to Independent Lens: The Homestretch

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Independent Lens
PBS


Three homeless teens brave Chicago winters, high school pressures, and life alone on the streets to build a brighter future. Against the odds, they recover from a life of abandonment to create new, surprising definitions of home. Continue


House approves permanent fix for Medicare doctor payment

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


For more than a decade, doctors who treat Medicare patients have been threatened with pay cuts due to a faulty formula of how doctors are reimbursed. But in a rare bipartisan agreement, the House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed a deal to permanently end the problem and reward quality of care, not quantity. Gwen Ifill learns more from Mary Agnes Carey of Kaiser Health News. Continue


The Blind Men and the Elephant

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Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies
PBS


This episode picks up the story in the wake of the declaration of a “war on cancer” by Richard Nixon in 1971 and the search for a cure. In the lab, rapid progress is made in understanding the essential nature of the cancer cell, leading to the revolutionary discovery of the genetic basis of cancer, but few new therapies become available. Continue


The Vaccine War

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FRONTLINE
PBS


Amid a new outbreak of measles, health officials are again urging parents to immunize their children and reassuring them that there is no link between vaccines and disorders like autism. But the war over vaccines rages on, pitting the scientific establishment against a populist coalition of parents, celebrities, and activists. Continue


Beijing+20; Hillary Clinton Doctrine; "War on Women" Over?

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To The Contrary
PBS


Beijing+20: How far have women come and what still needs to be done, 20 years after the famed women's conference? Hillary Clinton Doctrine: How much has Hillary Clinton done to improve women's lives? "War on Women": Democrats say it's back, while Republicans say it's over. PANEL: Kellyanne Conway; Neera Tanden; Erin Matson; Rina Shah Continue


Can a helmet sensor help prevent brain trauma in athletes?

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


As we learn more about the effects of concussions and sports-related head trauma, parents, coaches and medical professionals are debating how to keep players safe. Some are looking to technology, like a device worn under the helmet that shows the force of impact after a fall or collision. Hari Sreenivasan reports as part of our Breakthroughs series. Continue


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