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Debating the pros and cons of freezing eggs

Image of Debating the pros and cons of freezing eggs
PBS NewsHour
PBS


News of Apple and Facebook paying for their employees’ egg freezing has sparked conversation on the advancement of family planning. Gwen Ifill speaks with Sarah Elizabeth Richards, author of “Motherhood Rescheduled” and Alta Charo of the University of Wisconsin-Madison on the benefits, risks and choices women face. Continue


Searching for the ripple effects of history-making tech

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


In the new book and PBS series “How We Got to Now,” Steven Johnson presents six game-changing innovations and how they shaped the modern world. Hari Sreenivasan talks to Johnson about surprising connections between invention and American society. Continue


Restored wetlands welcome wildlife around San Francisco Bay

Image of Restored wetlands welcome wildlife around San Francisco Bay
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Climate change and resulting rising sea levels threaten a number of dwindling species in the San Francisco Bay Area. A new restoration project transforms industrial salt ponds into thriving marshland habitats to provide a new home for rodents, birds and fish. The NewsHour’s Cat Wise reports on another benefit: increased flood protection for human residents. Continue


Emma Watson & HeForShe; Julia Pierson; Christy Turlington

Image of Emma Watson & HeForShe; Julia Pierson; Christy Turlington
To The Contrary
PBS


Emma Watson & HeForShe: The role of men in feminism. Julia Pierson: Did the woman formerly in charge of the Secret Service fall off "the Glass Cliff?" Christy Turlington: This supermodel and advocate helps women around the world, along with her non-profit, Every Mother Counts. PANEL: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton; Rina Shah; Anushay Hossain; Darlene Kennedy Continue


Fears of another volcanic eruption rattle Japan

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


In Japan, Saturday's surprise eruption of Mt. Ontake killed at least 36 people and covered the mountain in thick smoke and piles of ash. Since then, rescue efforts have been hampered by toxic gases and fears of another eruption. Science correspondent Miles O’Brien and NASA’s Thomas Wagner join Judy Woodruff to discuss the difficulty of predicting volcanic eruptions. Continue


David Pogue on why consumers care about net neutrality

Image of David Pogue on why consumers care about net neutrality
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Net neutrality is the idea that all Internet content should be treated equally in how it’s delivered to consumers -- a concept that is being debated at the Federal Communications Commission. Hari Sreenivasan sits down with David Pogue of Yahoo Tech to discuss the FCC’s proposal to create “fast” and “slow” traffic lanes on the web, and why the issue has struck a chord with the public. Continue


Using drones to limit fertilizer flow into Lake Erie

Image of Using drones to limit fertilizer flow into Lake Erie
PBS NewsHour
PBS


A toxic algae bloom in Lake Erie this summer left the city of Toledo, Ohio, without drinking water for three days. Now environmentalists and farmers are working to prevent future blooms by evaluating fertilizer use in hopes of cutting excess runoff. Special correspondent Christy McDonald of Detroit Public Television reports on how drones may be a tool for maximizing crops and minimizing pollution. Continue


Apple offers new way to access your wallet with your phone

Image of Apple offers new way to access your wallet with your phone
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Apple unveiled its new products -- a larger iPhone, as well as the Apple Watch and a new pay system -- that boast advances for phone, watch and wallet. Gwen Ifill interviews John Simons of the Associated Press for a look at the new products and what they signal about current consumer technology. Continue


The roots of ‘Anonymous,’ the infamous hacking community

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


As online hacking becomes more common, interest in the individuals and groups behind such cyber attacks rises. Hari Sreenivasan speaks with David Kushner of The New Yorker on the origins of one of the most infamous hacking groups, “Anonymous.” Continue


‘Crowd-sourced’ science sheds new light on olinguito

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


In the year since the discovery of the olinguito — a small, furry, tree-dwelling member of the raccoon family, living in the forests of Colombia and Ecuador — the mammal has gone from being literally unknown to being surprisingly well-documented. Zoologist Kristofer Helgen of the Smithsonian Institution joins Jeffrey Brown to discuss how the public has contributed to tracking the olinguito. Continue


Tracking killer comets before they strike

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


It's only a matter of time before a big comet or asteroid is on a collision course with Earth. Will scientists discover it, and be able to do something about it, ahead of time? Science correspondent Miles O'Brien talks to NASA astronomers who troll for trouble in the sky. Continue


Antibiotics on the Farm

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FRONTLINE
PBS


In this excerpt from FRONTLINE’s "The Trouble with Antibiotics," premiering Tues., Oct. 14 on PBS, FRONTLINE correspondent David E. Hoffman asks FDA commissioner Margaret Hamburg why—after decades of antibiotic use on the farm—there is so little data on how many antibiotics are being used there, and for what purpose. Visit pbs.org/frontline for more information. Continue


Will flight tracking evolve in wake of Malaysia Air mystery?

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


More than six months ago, Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 disappeared on its trip from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. Two months of searching for wreckage and clues yielded no definitive answers about what happened. On Monday the search resumed. Jeffrey Brown talks to science correspondent Miles O’Brien about the continuing investigation and the upcoming NOVA report “Why Planes Vanish.” Continue


35,000 walruses on Alaska shore a sign of tremendous change

Image of 35,000 walruses on Alaska shore a sign of tremendous change
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Walruses are one of many animals who need Arctic sea ice. But when that ice melts, they must to go ashore to rest and find food. In Alaska, 35,000 walruses have been observed on one beach. Judy Woodruff speaks with Margaret Williams of the World Wildlife Fund about the consequences of disappearing ice for animals and how humans are connected to the story. Continue


Indians beam with pride over successful Mars mission

Image of Indians beam with pride over successful Mars mission
PBS NewsHour
PBS


India has joined the U.S., the former Soviet Union and the European Union as one of the elite few to successfully send a spacecraft to Mars, on its first try and for only $75 million -- a fraction of the cost of other space missions. But there have been debates over whether the money could be better spent in a country where millions live in poverty. Hari Sreenivasan reports. Continue


David Pogue on why consumers care about net neutrality

Image of David Pogue on why consumers care about net neutrality
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Net neutrality is the idea that all Internet content should be treated equally in how it’s delivered to consumers -- a concept that is being debated at the Federal Communications Commission. Hari Sreenivasan sits down with David Pogue of Yahoo Tech to discuss the FCC’s proposal to create “fast” and “slow” traffic lanes on the web, and why the issue has struck a chord with the public. Continue


Using drones to limit fertilizer flow into Lake Erie

Image of Using drones to limit fertilizer flow into Lake Erie
PBS NewsHour
PBS


A toxic algae bloom in Lake Erie this summer left the city of Toledo, Ohio, without drinking water for three days. Now environmentalists and farmers are working to prevent future blooms by evaluating fertilizer use in hopes of cutting excess runoff. Special correspondent Christy McDonald of Detroit Public Television reports on how drones may be a tool for maximizing crops and minimizing pollution. Continue


Saving the Great Lakes from toxic algae

Image of Saving the Great Lakes from toxic algae
PBS NewsHour
PBS


How can the great lakes recover from agricultural runoff and toxic algae blooms? Yesterday, the EPA announced it will distribute $12 million to educate farmers and improve water quality in the region. Detroit Public Television’s Christy McDonald speaks with scientists about their search for a solution to runoff-fueled toxins. Continue


MAKERS Season 2 - Preview

Image of MAKERS Season 2 - Preview
Makers: Women Who Make America
PBS


Six new documentaries in the MAKERS project feature groundbreaking American women in different spheres of influence: war, comedy, space, business, Hollywood and politics. Airs Tuesdays, September 30-November 4, 2014 at 9/8c. Check your local listings. Continue


Return to Fukushima with Miles O'Brien

Image of Return to Fukushima with Miles O'Brien
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Three years after the disaster at Fukushima, science correspondent Miles O'Brien returned to the Daiichi nuclear plant for an exclusive look at the site. Follow Miles on a never-before-seen tour of Daiichi's sister site, Fukushima Daini, which narrowly avoided a meltdown during the Tohoku earthquake. As the country debates turning its reactors back on, Miles asks: will Japan have a nuclear future? Continue


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