Change
Station

Science & Technology

Filter topics
Virtual reality bursts through the movie screen at Sundance

Image of Virtual reality bursts through the movie screen at Sundance
PBS NewsHour
PBS


What if watching a movie was more like being inside the movie? With virtual reality, your brain can be tricked into believing that you’re flying or in a different country -- a powerful creative tool for storytellers. Jeffrey Brown visits the Sundance Film Festival to witness how filmmakers are beginning to use the burgeoning technology. Continue


Drive the car of the future? No, it drives you

Image of Drive the car of the future? No, it drives you
PBS NewsHour
PBS


A big sensation at the Consumer Electronic Show this year was a preview of the autonomous driving car, a vehicle equipped with a supercomputing chip and software that can recognize other vehicles and obstacles. Special correspondent Steve Goldbloom takes the passenger seat in one of these connected cars. Continue


While the drone industry zooms, regulation lags

Image of While the drone industry zooms, regulation lags
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Professional and recreational uses for drones have driven a fast-growing industry, but safety and privacy laws are struggling to keep up. Science correspondent Miles O’Brien reports on why everyone from farmers to football coaches are flying drones, and what challenges the government faces in regulating the unmanned aerial vehicles. Continue


NASA Administrator Charles Bolden

Image of NASA Administrator Charles Bolden
Tavis Smiley
PBS


Bolden discusses his pioneering career and NASA's space exploration objectives. Continue


Extreme Realities Preview

Image of Extreme Realities Preview
Journey to Planet Earth
PBS


In the wake of recent political conflicts and severe weather events, we ask these fundamental questions: (1) are we merely experiencing once in a hundred year weather events or are they early warning signals of a new normal; (2) have we already reached a tipping point pushing our planet towards an environmental cliff; and (3) are there ways to mitigate or adapt to these newly emerging threats? Continue


Why is Obama weighing in on net neutrality?

Image of Why is Obama weighing in on net neutrality?
PBS NewsHour
PBS


More than 3 million commenters crashed the Federal Communications Commission website in July to weigh in on the issue of net neutrality. Now President Obama has added his strong support, directing the FCC to protect equal access to all web content. Judy Woodruff speaks with U.S. chief technology officer Megan Smith about the president’s move. Continue


Inventor John Steinbaugh's next big idea

Image of Inventor John Steinbaugh's next big idea
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Inventor and army veteran John Steinbaugh tells the PBS NewsHour describes his ideal invention: goggles that would show vital signs for fellow soldiers. Continue


How robots and spacesuits could aid Ebola prevention

Image of How robots and spacesuits could aid Ebola prevention
PBS NewsHour
PBS


The Ebola outbreak is still racing well ahead efforts to contain it. Can science and technology do more to slow the spread and save lives? John Holdren, the president’s top science adviser, sits down with science correspondent Miles O’Brien to discuss designing better safety gear, the outlook for vaccine testing and why the Obama administration is opposed to an Ebola travel ban. Continue


Tracking killer comets before they strike

Image of Tracking killer comets before they strike
PBS NewsHour
PBS


It's only a matter of time before a big comet or asteroid is on a collision course with Earth. Will scientists discover it, and be able to do something about it, ahead of time? Science correspondent Miles O'Brien talks to NASA astronomers who troll for trouble in the sky. Continue


Journey to Planet Earth (Series)

Journey to Planet Earth
PBS


J2PE dramatizes new ways of looking at the delicate relationship between people and the world they inhabit. It's designed to help viewers understand the complexities of the most important environmental issues of the 21st century. Through an interdisciplinary approach, these programs reach beyond the physical sciences and draw connections to politics, economics, anthropology, sociology, and history Continue


Ben Franklin's Bones

Image of Ben Franklin's Bones
Secrets of the Dead
PBS


When skeletal remains of at least 10 people turned up in the basement of Benjamin Franklin’s British residence, people wondered if the Founding Father might have had a much darker side. Franklin was aware of the bodies in his basement, but they weren’t the victims of violent acts. Rather, they were used for the purposes of an illegal anatomy school that helped shaped modern medicine. Continue


NewsHour Shares: Bill Gates drinks water purified from waste

Image of NewsHour Shares: Bill Gates drinks water purified from waste
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Human waste is being turned into drinkable water at a treatment plant in Washington state, with funding by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. In our NewsHour Shares video of the day, we see how the pioneering idea could be a lifechanger for developing countries struggling with both sewage and clean water access. Continue


The Children’s Climate Crusade

Image of The Children’s Climate Crusade
Moyers & Company
PBS


The very agencies created to protect our environment have been hijacked by the polluting industries they were meant to regulate. It may just turn out that the judicial system, our children and their children will save us from ourselves, Mary Christina Wood, a legal scholar, tells Bill Moyers this week. Continue


Extreme Realities: Program Preview

Image of Extreme Realities: Program Preview
Journey to Planet Earth
PBS


In the wake of recent political conflicts and severe weather events, we ask these fundamental questions: (1) are we merely experiencing once in a hundred year weather events or are they early warning signals of a new normal; (2) have we already reached a tipping point pushing our planet towards an environmental cliff; and (3) are there ways to mitigate or adapt to these newly emerging threats? Continue


Studying Alaska's ice and snow to track climate change

Image of Studying Alaska's ice and snow to track climate change
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Glacial ice is like nature's ancient history book, and today the story is climate change. Science correspondent Miles O'Brien reports from Alaska, where researchers are studying how warmer temperatures affect the ancient ice and the living things that depend on it. Continue


How mini sponges could save lives on the battlefield

Image of How mini sponges could save lives on the battlefield
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Combat medics have one mission: keep the injured alive until they can be safely treated elsewhere. But while survival rates have improved dramatically in the last few decades, one of the biggest challenges that medics still face is uncontrolled bleeding. The NewsHour’s Cat Wise reports on a new invention that stops bleeding much faster than traditional gauze. Continue


Explosion raises questions about commercial space travel

Image of Explosion raises questions about commercial space travel
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Seconds after launch, a privately owned, unmanned rocket contracted by NASA to deliver supplies to the International Space Station exploded. What went wrong? Science correspondent Miles O’Brien joins Judy Woodruff for an analysis of the accident and the privatization of the U.S. space program. Continue


Debating the pros and cons of freezing eggs

Image of Debating the pros and cons of freezing eggs
PBS NewsHour
PBS


News of Apple and Facebook paying for their employees’ egg freezing has sparked conversation on the advancement of family planning. Gwen Ifill speaks with Sarah Elizabeth Richards, author of “Motherhood Rescheduled” and Alta Charo of the University of Wisconsin-Madison on the benefits, risks and choices women face. Continue


Searching for the ripple effects of history-making tech

Image of Searching for the ripple effects of history-making tech
PBS NewsHour
PBS


In the new book and PBS series “How We Got to Now,” Steven Johnson presents six game-changing innovations and how they shaped the modern world. Hari Sreenivasan talks to Johnson about surprising connections between invention and American society. Continue


Antibiotics on the Farm

Image of Antibiotics on the Farm
FRONTLINE
PBS


In this excerpt from FRONTLINE’s "The Trouble with Antibiotics," premiering Tues., Oct. 14 on PBS, FRONTLINE correspondent David E. Hoffman asks FDA commissioner Margaret Hamburg why—after decades of antibiotic use on the farm—there is so little data on how many antibiotics are being used there, and for what purpose. Visit pbs.org/frontline for more information. Continue


Providing Support for pbs.org Learn More
Sponsored Links