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Scott Kelly sets out to break an American record in space

Image of Scott Kelly sets out to break an American record in space
PBS NewsHour
PBS


This week, astronaut Scott Kelly arrived at the International Space Station, where he will stay for a year -- the longest duration of time any American has spent in space. While Scott is in orbit, researchers on Earth will be studying his identical twin brother Mark Kelly for insight into how space affects the human body. Jeffrey Brown learns more from former astronaut Chris Hadfield. Continue


Tech startups see gold in Baby Boomers’ golden years

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


With more than 100 million Americans now over the age of 50, technology companies are eager to find new ways to cater to Baby Boomer consumers. From a mobile app that offers medical tips to wearable devices, special correspondent Megan Hughes reports on how startups are designing products to appeal to older Americans’ desires for longevity and wellness. Continue


What two discoveries suggest about life in the solar system

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


Science correspondent Miles O’Brien joins Judy Woodruff to discuss two space stories that center around the search for life and how it began. NASA’s Dawn spacecraft arrived in orbit around the dwarf planet Ceres, which scientists believe shows signs of life-sustaining water. Meanwhile, new research found that Mars once had enough water to cover 20 percent of the planet. Continue


Singer-songwriter Melissa Manchester

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Tavis Smiley
PBS


The legendary singer-songwriter discusses her highly anticipated new album, "You Gotta Love the Life." Continue


How pro survey-takers are shaping scientific research

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


An online job forum called Mechanical Turk has created a pool of professional survey-takers who complete hundreds of inquiries a week. For academic researchers, it’s cheap, easy to use and the response flood in fast. But how good is the data being collected? Judy Woodruff learns more from the NewsHour’s Jenny Marder. Continue


Increasing hydropower hits a bipartisan sweet spot

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


Energy will be a key issue for the new Congress, and hydropower is one of the few areas of agreement between Democrats and Republicans. Legislative changes have made it easier to develop small-scale hydroelectric projects and both parties find it advantageous. Special correspondent Dan Boyce of Inside Energy reports on what else proponents are seeking from lawmakers. Continue


Why are hackers targeting insurance companies?

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


Hackers broke into a database at Anthem, the nation’s second largest health insurance provider, which contained names, social security numbers, income data and addresses of 80 million people. Judy Woodruff speaks with Mark Bower of Voltage Security about who might be behind the attack and why they would want to target an insurer. Continue


Take a Closer Look at To Catch A Comet

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To Catch A Comet
PBS


Flip through photos from To Catch A Comet. Learn about the daring attempt to land an orbiter on the surface of a comet as it zoomed around the sun. Re-airs March 4 at 10 pm ET. Continue


Virtual reality bursts through the movie screen at Sundance

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


What if watching a movie was more like being inside the movie? With virtual reality, your brain can be tricked into believing that you’re flying or in a different country -- a powerful creative tool for storytellers. Jeffrey Brown visits the Sundance Film Festival to witness how filmmakers are beginning to use the burgeoning technology. Continue


Drive the car of the future? No, it drives you

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


A big sensation at the Consumer Electronic Show this year was a preview of the autonomous driving car, a vehicle equipped with a supercomputing chip and software that can recognize other vehicles and obstacles. Special correspondent Steve Goldbloom takes the passenger seat in one of these connected cars. Continue


Picturing Kodak’s transformation in the digital age

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


Eastman Kodak was once one of the nation’s leading companies, but since the rise of digital technology, the photographic film company has been forced to downsize and find alternative ways to make profits. A short documentary by The New York Times looks at how the company has changed. Continue


Tech giants battle for classrooms in Amish country

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


Tech companies like Apple, Google and Microsoft are competing to get their products into classrooms around the U.S. Even in Amish country, where families live simply without technology like television or phones, some Amish children are learning to use these high-tech devices as part of the curriculum. The NewsHour’s April Brown reports from Ohio. Continue


Why tech companies struggle with gender equality

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


A discrimination lawsuit in California involving a former employee at a Silicon Valley venture capital firm signals another instance of that industry being critiqued for its treatment of women. Jeffrey Brown talks to Nicole Sanchez of Vaya Consulting and Nellie Bowles of Re/code. Continue


Scientists hope to protect the piping plover’s winter home

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


A remote island in the Bahamas is home to dozens of species of native and migratory birds, including one that has been on the endangered species list for decades. Scientists would like to see the area known as the Joulter Cays turned into a national park, but not everyone agrees. The NewsHour’s Cat Wise follows a group of researchers as they track and study the piping plover in its winter habitat. Continue


Testing out robotic arms of the future

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


Improvements in body armor have kept more soldiers alive, but many veterans returning from Iraq or Afghanistan have come back with debilitating injuries. Science correspondent Miles O’Brien, whose left arm was amputated last year, tests out some of the future limbs now in development. Continue


The $20 prosthetic knee that could change lives in India

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


In Jaipur, India, about 150 patients show up every day at an organization that creates low-cost prosthetic limbs for people with mobility problems. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on an innovative and affordable design being developed for those who have lost legs above the knee. Continue


Laboratory of Art

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The Open Mind
PBS


School of the Art Institute of Chicago president and former National Science Foundation director Walter Massey explores art and science as an interdisciplinary laboratory for human advancement. Continue


Ben Franklin's Bones

Image of Ben Franklin's Bones
Secrets of the Dead
PBS


When skeletal remains of at least 10 people turned up in the basement of Benjamin Franklin’s British residence, people wondered if the Founding Father might have had a much darker side. Franklin was aware of the bodies in his basement, but they weren’t the victims of violent acts. Rather, they were used for the purposes of an illegal anatomy school that helped shaped modern medicine. Continue


While the drone industry zooms, regulation lags

Image of While the drone industry zooms, regulation lags
PBS NewsHour
PBS


Professional and recreational uses for drones have driven a fast-growing industry, but safety and privacy laws are struggling to keep up. Science correspondent Miles O’Brien reports on why everyone from farmers to football coaches are flying drones, and what challenges the government faces in regulating the unmanned aerial vehicles. Continue


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