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#AskGwen: Social Media in Journalism

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Washington Week
PBS


After three decades as a journalist, Gwen Ifill reflects on how social media has changed her day-to-day job. "You don't start and end with social media," Gwen says. "You still have to do good old-fashioned, shoe-leather reporting, and if you do it right it actually enhances what we do in journalism." Continue


Flying a drone in a slum of Freetown, Sierra Leone

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


Cameron Hickey flies a drone in the Crew Bay slum of Freetown, Sierra Leone for Miles O'Brien's four-part series, Cracking Ebola's code. Continue


After the Storm: Interactive Doc on Tornado Disaster

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Independent Lens
PBS


Immerse yourself in this new online, interactive documentary about 2011 Tuscaloosa tornado and read interview with the project's director, an Alabama native, on how making the film was cathartic experience for him. Continue


XPRIZE CEO Peter Diamandis

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Tavis Smiley
PBS


The CEO of XPRIZE, the foundation that funds some of the largest innovative projects in the world, discusses his new book, entitled "Bold: How to Go Big, Create Wealth, and Impact the World." Continue


How drinking water pipes can also deliver electric power

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


Hydroelectricity -- using the flow of water to generate power -- has long been a small but key source of renewable energy. How can cities around the country better harness that potential? A startup in Portland, Oregon, has developed a system that gets energy from gravity-fed drinking water pipes to produce electricity without any environmental impact. Hari Sreenivasan reports. Continue


Author/Neuroscientist Dr. Michael Gazzaniga

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Tavis Smiley
PBS


The director of the SAGE Center for the Study of the Mind at UC Santa Barbara shares the discoveries detailed in his new book, "Tales from Both Sides of the Brain: A Life in Neuroscience." Continue


Scott Kelly sets out to break an American record in space

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


This week, astronaut Scott Kelly arrived at the International Space Station, where he will stay for a year -- the longest duration of time any American has spent in space. While Scott is in orbit, researchers on Earth will be studying his identical twin brother Mark Kelly for insight into how space affects the human body. Jeffrey Brown learns more from former astronaut Chris Hadfield. Continue


Tech startups see gold in Baby Boomers’ golden years

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


With more than 100 million Americans now over the age of 50, technology companies are eager to find new ways to cater to Baby Boomer consumers. From a mobile app that offers medical tips to wearable devices, special correspondent Megan Hughes reports on how startups are designing products to appeal to older Americans’ desires for longevity and wellness. Continue


What two discoveries suggest about life in the solar system

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


Science correspondent Miles O’Brien joins Judy Woodruff to discuss two space stories that center around the search for life and how it began. NASA’s Dawn spacecraft arrived in orbit around the dwarf planet Ceres, which scientists believe shows signs of life-sustaining water. Meanwhile, new research found that Mars once had enough water to cover 20 percent of the planet. Continue


Singer-songwriter Melissa Manchester

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Tavis Smiley
PBS


The legendary singer-songwriter discusses her highly anticipated new album, "You Gotta Love the Life." Continue


TTC Extra: "Trouble With Girls"

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To The Contrary
PBS


Biochemist Tim Hunt resigned as honorary professor at University College London after backlash from his commentary on the issue with working with women. PANEL: Sam Bennett, Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), Karin Agness, Francesca Chambers Continue


Sea Butterflies in Danger

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NOVA
PBS


If pteropod populations decline or vanish due to rising ocean acidity, the consequences for marine life could be dire. Continue


Margaret Brown Returns to the Gulf for The Great Invisible

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Independent Lens
PBS


Filmmaker Margaret Brown, a native of Mobile, returns to the Gulf Coast to tell human story of the aftermath of Deepwater Horizon explosion, on the fifth anniversary of spill. Continue


Aboard the Deepwater Horizon

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Independent Lens
PBS


In 2007 Deepwater Horizon Chief Mechanic Doug Brown, featured in the Independent Lens film The Great Invisible, gave his friends and family back on the mainland a private tour of the oil rig via home video. Discover what life aboard the rig was like before disaster struck by exploring this interactive video tour. Continue


Mapping dark matter may help solve a cosmic mystery

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


We can't see dark matter, but scientists have made the largest map yet of the invisible material that helps make up the universe. Researchers used a dark energy camera and a large telescope to create a color-coded chart of just a small part of the cosmos. Jeffrey Brown talks to Sean Carroll of the California Institute of Technology about how they did it and why it matters. Continue


How Arson Investigation Has Changed

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Independent Lens
PBS


For further reading as a companion to Little Hope Was Arson, we take a look at new trends in arson forensics. The science supporting investigation has improved, but sometimes the innocent are still being indicted. Continue


Picturing Kodak’s transformation in the digital age

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


Eastman Kodak was once one of the nation’s leading companies, but since the rise of digital technology, the photographic film company has been forced to downsize and find alternative ways to make profits. A short documentary by The New York Times looks at how the company has changed. Continue


Tech giants battle for classrooms in Amish country

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


Tech companies like Apple, Google and Microsoft are competing to get their products into classrooms around the U.S. Even in Amish country, where families live simply without technology like television or phones, some Amish children are learning to use these high-tech devices as part of the curriculum. The NewsHour’s April Brown reports from Ohio. Continue


Why tech companies struggle with gender equality

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


A discrimination lawsuit in California involving a former employee at a Silicon Valley venture capital firm signals another instance of that industry being critiqued for its treatment of women. Jeffrey Brown talks to Nicole Sanchez of Vaya Consulting and Nellie Bowles of Re/code. Continue


Scientists hope to protect the piping plover’s winter home

Image of Scientists hope to protect the piping plover’s winter home
PBS NewsHour
PBS


A remote island in the Bahamas is home to dozens of species of native and migratory birds, including one that has been on the endangered species list for decades. Scientists would like to see the area known as the Joulter Cays turned into a national park, but not everyone agrees. The NewsHour’s Cat Wise follows a group of researchers as they track and study the piping plover in its winter habitat. Continue


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