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MAKERS Season 2 - Preview

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Makers: Women Who Make America
PBS


Six new documentaries in the MAKERS project feature groundbreaking American women in different spheres of influence: war, comedy, space, business, Hollywood and politics. Airs Tuesdays, September 30-November 4, 2014 at 9/8c. Check your local listings. Continue


‘Crowd-sourced’ science sheds new light on olinguito

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


In the year since the discovery of the olinguito — a small, furry, tree-dwelling member of the raccoon family, living in the forests of Colombia and Ecuador — the mammal has gone from being literally unknown to being surprisingly well-documented. Zoologist Kristofer Helgen of the Smithsonian Institution joins Jeffrey Brown to discuss how the public has contributed to tracking the olinguito. Continue


Ice People

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Global Voices
PBS


No one gets to Antarctica by accident. For the few scientific teams who brave this beautiful and silent landscape, it feels like another planet. Their discoveries yield secrets about the Earth’s past and future, and prompt questions about our place in the world. This film captures a unique experience of vastness and claustrophobia, of excitement and waiting, and of a life set to nature’s rhythm. Continue


TTC Extra: Women In Tech

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To The Contrary
PBS


Women continue to be underrepresented in the technology industry. A few top colleges have managed to reverse the trend by reaching out to high school teachers, offering mentoring programs and focusing recruitment on prospective female students. PANEL: Former EEOC Chair Cari Dominguez, Former Judge & Federal Prosecutor Debra Carnahan, Conservative Commentator Darlene Kennedy, Journalist Anushay Continue


Sexism & Tech; Immigration Crisis; Fertility Decline

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To The Contrary
PBS


Sexism & Tech: Yet another scandal in the tech industry leads to accusations of "frat culture." Immigration Crisis: Thousands of minors who crossed into the US illegally are being deported. Fertility Decline: Why the US's record-low fertility rate may not be cause for alarm. PANEL: Rina Shah, Kim Gandy, Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, Darlene Kennedy Continue


Supreme Court limits cell phone searches, TV signal sharing

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


In a sweeping decision to protect privacy in the digital age, the Supreme Court ruled 9-0 that police need a warrant to search cell phones. Marcia Coyle of The National Law Journal joins Gwen Ifill to look at their unanimous decision, as well as the court’s ruling in a case against Aereo, an Internet startup that sought to share broadcast network TV signals without paying a fee. Continue


Searching for the holy grail of snake bite antidotes

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


Although snake bites are rarely fatal in the United States, every year about 100,000 people die worldwide after being bitten by venomous snakes. A California doctor has developed a nasal spray treatment that may be able to help some snake bite victims halt paralysis before they reach a hospital. Special correspondent Spencer Michels has the story. Continue


Mass Shootings; Arianna Huffington's Thrive; Maya Angelou

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To The Contrary
PBS


Mass shootings are looked at through a gendered lens. Arianna Huffington's new book teaches us how to Thrive with rest and recovery. Remembering poet and author Dr. Maya Angelou. PANEL: Sabrina Schaeffer, Dr. Lara Brown, Donna Brazile, Francesca Chambers Continue


Why solar technology cannot save us

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


PBS NewsHour economics correspondent Paul Solman hears from former big pharma executive Chris Martenson about how our economy requires unsustainable resources. But technology cannot make alternative sources of energy; it can only help us find them. Continue


TTC Extra: Women, Interrupted

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To The Contrary
PBS


Women are interrupted more than men, according to a new study. Men and women were given conversation topics and their chats were analyzed by researchers. Both men and women were more likely to interrupt women than men. PANEL: Darlene Kennedy, Sam Bennett, Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, Mercedes Viana Schlapp Continue


Big Men

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POV
PBS


An unprecedented inside look at the global deal making and dark underside of energy development -- a contest for money and power that is reshaping the world. Continue


Return to Fukushima with Miles O'Brien

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


Three years after the disaster at Fukushima, science correspondent Miles O'Brien returned to the Daiichi nuclear plant for an exclusive look at the site. Follow Miles on a never-before-seen tour of Daiichi's sister site, Fukushima Daini, which narrowly avoided a meltdown during the Tohoku earthquake. As the country debates turning its reactors back on, Miles asks: will Japan have a nuclear future? Continue


Connecting strength and vulnerability of the creative brain

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


Why have so many creative minds suffered from mental illness? Nancy Andreasen, Andrew H. Woods Chair of Psychiatry at the University of Iowa, has devoted decades of study to the physical differences in the brains of writers and other highly accomplished individuals. Produced in partnership with The Atlantic magazine, Judy Woodruff visits Andreasen to explore her work. Continue


Former astronaut Buzz Aldrin

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Tavis Smiley
PBS


A best-selling author and one of only 12 men who have walked on the moon, Aldrin explains his passion for continuing exploration of the solar system. Continue


Mapping the circuitry of a fish's brain

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


At the National Institutes of Health, Chris Harris and Kevin Briggman are working on mapping the circuitry of a living fish's brain, watching the neurons fire in real time. The goal is to understand how the brain takes information and acts on it. Continue


Risky Business Project quantifies climate change costs

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


If you are an American investor, the risks of climate change should matter to you. That's the message from the Risky Business Project, led by former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, billionaire financier Tom Steyer and former Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson. These business and political leaders have come together to quantify the economic costs. Judy Woodruff talks to Paulson about the project. Continue


Home Births; Pope Francis; Hillary Clinton & World Bank

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To The Contrary
PBS


Home Births: A new reality show chronicles women having babies in the wild. Pope Francis: The pontiff says couples should have children, not raise pets. Hillary Clinton & World Bank: Clinton and other leaders weigh in on the economic advantages of empowering women. PANEL: Erin Matson; Karin Agness; Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC); Linda Chavez Continue


What the NSA can secretly put on your device

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FRONTLINE
PBS


Security expert Bruce Schneier breaks down the NSA's Tailored Access Operations unit, and how it is able to install its own surveillance hardware on commercial computers and devices. Continue


What is peak oil, and will fracking buy us time?

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PBS NewsHour
PBS


PBS NewsHour economics correspondent Paul Solman speaks with former big pharma executive Chris Martenson about why the money the U.S. printed after the financial crash would have been better spent on alternative energy rather than on the banks. Continue


How Can the NSA Get Onto Your iPhone?

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FRONTLINE
PBS


Security expert Ashkan Soltani explains the NSA's DROPOUT JEEP program, which allows the agency to remotely download data from iPhones, as well as turn on the devices microphone and camera. FRONTLINE animates illustrations on top of the interview. Continue


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