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Gooseberry Falls 2

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NOVA
PBS


This video explores Gooseberry Falls. Continue


The Mystery of Matter: Search for the Elements | Preview

Image of The Mystery of Matter: Search for the Elements | Preview
The Mystery of Matter
PBS


Watch this series about one of the great adventures in the history of science: the long, continuing quest to understand what the world is made of. Join Emmy-winner Michael Emerson to see not only what scientific explorers discovered, but also how. Premieres Wednesday, August 19, 2015 at 8 p.m. ET. Check local listings. Continue


Episode 2: Unruly Elements | Preview | Dmitri Mendeleev

Image of Episode 2: Unruly Elements | Preview | Dmitri Mendeleev
The Mystery of Matter
PBS


Dmitri Mendeleev invents the Periodic Table, bringing order to the elements. This order is shattered when Marie Curie discovers radioactivity, revealing that elements can change identities —and atoms contain undiscovered parts. Premieres Wednesday, August 19, 2015 at 9 p.m. ET. Check local listings. Continue


Episode 1: Out of Thin Air | Preview | Priestley & Lavoisier

Image of Episode 1: Out of Thin Air | Preview | Priestley & Lavoisier
The Mystery of Matter
PBS


See how the discovery of oxygen by one of science’s great odd couples — Joseph Priestley and Antoine Lavoisier — triggers a worldwide search for new elements. Soon caught up in the hunt is chemist Humphry Davy, whose showmanship dazzles London audiences. Premieres Wednesday, August 19, 2015 at 8 p.m. ET. Check local listings. Continue


How Many Stars Are There?

It’s Okay to Be Smart
PBS


Are there more stars out there than grains of sand on Earth? Continue


Harry Moseley | Changing the Role of Scientists in War

Image of Harry Moseley | Changing the Role of Scientists in War
The Mystery of Matter
PBS


In 1913, English graduate student Harry Moseley redefined the Periodic Table using X-rays to reveal the importance of atomic number — the number of protons in an atom’s nucleus. But when World War I broke out, Moseley enlisted and was killed by a sniper’s bullet in Turkey. His shocking death at age 27 forever changed the role of scientists during war. Continue


Dmitri Mendeleev | The Element Mendeleev Never Accepted

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The Mystery of Matter
PBS


Dmitri Mendeleev’s grasp of chemistry was so legendary that he accurately predicted the properties of three elements before they were discovered. But the "father of the Periodic Table" never accepted the properties of radium, since the idea that it glowed in the dark because it was changing into other elements flew in the face of his belief that elements were eternal. Continue


Antoine Lavoisier | Lavoisier’s Better Half

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The Mystery of Matter
PBS


Before and after work each day as a tax administrator for the king of France, Antoine Lavoisier spent hours in his private laboratory, and one day a week he welcomed others to take part in his ambitious experiments. But his most important collaborator was his wife, Marie Anne, who brought her own extraordinary talents to their partnership. Continue


Science Isn't for the Faint Hearted

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Gorongosa Park
PBS


Meet Gorongosa's very own Tarzan, Harith Farooq. One problem: he has no head for heights. He'll have to overcome his fears to make a dizzying descent into a steep gorge. Continue


Sharks at Osprey Reef

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Life on the Reef
PBS


View the sharks that live around Osprey Reef in Australia. Continue


Episode 1: Out of Thin Air | Preview | Humphry Davy

Image of Episode 1: Out of Thin Air | Preview | Humphry Davy
The Mystery of Matter
PBS


See how the discovery of oxygen by one of science’s great odd couples — Joseph Priestley and Antoine Lavoisier — triggers a worldwide search for new elements. Soon caught up in the hunt is chemist Humphry Davy, whose showmanship dazzles London audiences. Premieres Wednesday, August 19, 2015 at 8 p.m. ET. Check local listings. Continue


Episode 3: Into the Atom | Preview | Glenn Seaborg

Image of Episode 3: Into the Atom | Preview | Glenn Seaborg
The Mystery of Matter
PBS


Caught up in the race to discover the atom’s internal parts, Harry Moseley uses newly discovered X-rays to put the Periodic Table in a whole new light. Glenn Seaborg creates a new element —plutonium — that changes the world forever. Premieres Wednesday, August 19, 2015 at 10 p.m. ET. Check local listings. Continue


Episode 2: Unruly Elements | Preview | Marie Curie

Image of Episode 2: Unruly Elements | Preview | Marie Curie
The Mystery of Matter
PBS


Dmitri Mendeleev invents the Periodic Table, bringing order to the elements. This order is shattered when Marie Curie discovers radioactivity, revealing that elements can change identities —and atoms contain undiscovered parts. Premieres Wednesday, August 19, 2015 at 9 p.m. ET. Check local listings. Continue


Grand Canyon 2

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NOVA
PBS


This video explores the Grand Canyon. Continue


Glenn Seaborg | A Chemist Goes to War

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The Mystery of Matter
PBS


In 1941, a young Berkeley chemist named Glenn Seaborg created one of the first artificial elements: plutonium. When the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor plunged America into war, he joined the Manhattan Project and played a key role in creating the plutonium for the bomb that was dropped on the city of Nagasaki. Continue


Marie Curie | The Radium Craze

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The Mystery of Matter
PBS


After Marie and Pierre Curie’s discovery of radium, the new element’s wondrous ability to glow in the dark inspired a worldwide craze — a rush of radium-laced products that promised to cure everything from impotence to hair loss. What few people realized — and the Curies were reluctant to admit — was the great harm this radioactive element could do. Continue


Humphry Davy | Davy’s Greatest Failure

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The Mystery of Matter
PBS


Humphry Davy’s discovery of laughing gas made him famous and led to a new job at the Royal Institution in London, where he dazzled audiences with his popular lectures. But with his attention diverted, Davy failed to follow up on his observation that nitrous oxide could be used for anesthesia, thereby condemning thousands around the world to decades of needless surgical pain. Continue


How Do You Get a Deadly Snake Out of Your Car?

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Gorongosa Park
PBS


Wildlife cameraman Bob Poole and team go face-to-face with a spitting cobra that gets stuck in his car. Continue


Think Wednesday Continues August 5

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PBS Presents
PBS


Think Wednesday, Think PBS. Continues Wednesday, August 5 at 8/7c Continue


Joseph Priestley | A Momentous Encounter

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The Mystery of Matter
PBS


While holding a variety of jobs as a minister, teacher, lecturer and tutor, Joseph Priestley wrote prolifically on subjects ranging from education and theology to politics and science. Biographer Steven Johnson explains how Priestley’s idea for a book about electricity led to his warm friendship with Benjamin Franklin — and inspired him to become a scientist in his own right. Continue


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