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Nature's Time Capsules

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NOVA
PBS


By studying bogs, scientists can uncover thousands of years of Earth’s history. Continue


Amazing Places, Amazing Fossils: Tritheledont

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Your Inner Fish
PBS


The Bay of Fundy in Nova Scotia, Canada, is home not only to the world's largest tides, but also to some incredibly important fossils. Paleontologist Neil Shubin describes one particularly striking specimen from these cliffs: an animal in the midst of the reptile-to-mammal transition. Continue


Your Inner Fish

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Your Inner Fish
PBS


Our arms, legs, necks and lungs were bequeathed to us by a fish that lumbered onto land some 375 million years ago. The genetic legacy of this creature can be seen today in our own DNA, including the genes used to build our hands and limbs. Continue


The Mysteries of Optic Flow

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NOVA
PBS


How do birds manage to fly through narrow spaces without constantly bumping into trees or buildings? It turns out that they use a trick of the eye called optic flow. Understanding what optic flow is and how birds use it could help us build a safer world for our feathered friends. Continue


Geoff Tabin: 30 Seconds on Cataracts

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Secret Life of Scientists
PBS


Geoff Tabin is a Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences and Director of International Ophthalmology at the John A. Moran Eye Center and University of Utah. He is also the Co-Founder of the Himalayan Cataract Project. While not curing blindness, Geoff climbs mountains around the world. And with his buddies at the Oxford Dangerous Sport Club, he invented bungee jumping. Continue


Ancient Human Ancestors: Walking in the Woods

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Your Inner Fish
PBS


When did we start walking exclusively on two legs, and how did this transition take place? Neil Shubin pays a visit to Tim White and Owen Lovejoy, two anthropologists working together to understand "Ardi," a 4.4-million-year-old fossil that sheds light on our transition to bipedalism. Continue


Your Aching Back: A Gift from Your Ancient Ancestors

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Your Inner Fish
PBS


The shape of our backs keeps us balanced when we walk on two legs, but it comes at a cost. Anatomist Bruce Latimer shows how our transition to being exclusively bipedal has led to many common back ailments. Continue


What Can Fossil Teeth Tell Us?

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Your Inner Fish
PBS


You may not think there's much insight to be gleaned from a tooth, but paleontologist Neil Shubin shows us that's not the case. As he demonstrates with a collection of skeletons, teeth contain an incredible amount of information about how an animal lives its life. Continue


Amazing Places, Amazing Fossils: Lucy

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Your Inner Fish
PBS


Fossils of human ancestors from millions of years ago can be found in the rocks of Ethiopia. Paleontologist Don Johanson recounts his discovery of one iconic fossil, and the impact it had on our understanding of where we come from. Continue


Crystal Dilworth: Ballet, Neuroscience & A Man Eating Plant

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Secret Life of Scientists
PBS


Crystal Dilworth recently completed her Ph.D. in Molecular Neuroscience at Cal Tech. Her research has focused on the molecular basis for nicotine dependence. An accomplished life-long dancer, Crystal now choreographs Cal Tech's musical productions. That's right, she teaches other scientists to dance... and they're good! Continue


Finding the Origins of Human Color Vision

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Your Inner Fish
PBS


The ability to see the world in color is one most people take for granted. But our earliest primate ancestors lacked this ability. When and how did we gain the ability to see the world the way we do? Neil Shubin pays a visit to vision expert Jay Neitz to learn where our color vision comes from. Continue


Five Dogs With Crazy Résumés

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NOVA
PBS


Why do some dogs have short fur, others long tails, and still others wrinkly faces? Many dogs were bred to perform a specific tasks--from hunting vermin to wrangling bulls--and their physical characteristics were chosen to help them do their jobs. Continue


D-Day's Sunken Secrets Preview

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NOVA
PBS


Dive teams, submersibles, and robots explore a massive underwater WWII archeological site. Airing May 28, 2014 at 9 pm on PBS Continue


How Do We Know When Our Ancestors Lost Their Tails?

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Your Inner Fish
PBS


Unlike most other primates, apes don't have a tail. When did our ancestors lose this potentially useful appendage? Paleoanthropologist Holly Dunsworth introduces Neil Shubin to Proconsul, a fossil ape that provides some answers to that question. Continue


Geoff Tabin: Getting Sight Back

Image of Geoff Tabin: Getting Sight Back
Secret Life of Scientists
PBS


Geoff Tabin is a Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences and Director of International Ophthalmology at the John A. Moran Eye Center and University of Utah. He is also the Co-Founder of the Himalayan Cataract Project. While not curing blindness, Geoff climbs mountains around the world. And with his buddies at the Oxford Dangerous Sport Club, he invented bungee jumping. Continue


The 500-Million-Year History of the Human Brain

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Your Inner Fish
PBS


Even though your brain enables you to do some amazing things, its evolutionary story runs deep. Biologists Peter Holland and Neil Shubin go hunting for Amphioxus, a tiny, simple animal, whose genes show us just how ancient our brain truly is. Continue


Our Fishy Brain

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Your Inner Fish
PBS


While the human brain may seem exceptional, the truth is that it has some deep similarities with many other animals', including fish. Anatomist Neil Shubin dissects a fish brain and a human brain and shows us how much we have in common with sea-dwelling creatures. Continue


Meet Your Cousins: Squirrel Monkeys

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Your Inner Fish
PBS


Because of our evolutionary relationship, we have quite a bit in common with other living primates, including squirrel monkeys. See what we mean as you watch these agile monkeys navigate their forest world. Continue


Why Sharks Attack Preview

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NOVA
PBS


Will analyzing the hunting instincts of this endangered predator reduce deadly attacks? Continue


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