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First Peoples: Asia

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First Peoples
PBS


Discover the ancient humans living across Asia when Homo sapiens arrived. Our ancestors mated with them and their genes found a home within our DNA. More than that, they’ve helped us face down extinction. Continue


First Peoples: Africa

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First Peoples
PBS


200,000 years ago Homo sapiens appeared on the African landscape. While scientists have long imagined eastern Africa as a real-life Garden of Eden, the latest research suggests humans evolved in many places across the continent at the same time. Now, DNA reveals that our ancestors continued meeting, mating and hybridizing with other human type — creating ever greater diversity within us. Continue


The Amazing Barnacle Penis

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Gross Science
PBS


Well-endowed barnacles can change the size and shape of their penises. Continue


Bacon Bandages Remove Botflies

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Gross Science
PBS


Everyone loves bacon. Even parasitic maggots that live under your skin. Continue


Quick Bite: Why Does Asparagus Make Your Pee Smell?

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How Does It Grow
PBS


So you've eaten a helping of asparagus, and soon afterwards, you're struck by a particularly odiferous bathroom visit. Asparagus pee — that smelly urine that strikes after eating asparagus — what's up with that? Well, you'd be surprised how much scientific research has tried to get to the bottom of this. Here's what they’ve discovered. Continue


The Sagebrush Sea

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Nature
PBS


It’s been called The Big Empty – an immense sea of sagebrush that once stretched 500,000 square miles across North America. Yet it’s far from empty, as those who look closely will discover. In this ecosystem anchored by the sage, eagles and antelope, badgers and lizards, rabbits, wrens, owls, prairie dogs, songbirds, hawks and migrating birds of all description make their homes. Continue


A Human Hybrid?

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First Peoples
PBS


When Homo sapiens turned up in prehistoric Europe, they ran into the Neanderthals. The two types of human were similar enough – intellectually and culturally - to interbreed. Continue


Fences Create Problems for Pronghorn

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Nature
PBS


The pronghorn is the fastest land animal in North America. However, an increasingly fragmented landscape, divided by ranchers' fences, is creating problems for the fleet-footed creature. Continue


The Dangers of Genetic Isolation

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First Peoples
PBS


Witness the dangers of genetic isolation exemplified by the duck-billed platypus. Continue


The Curious Species

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First Peoples
PBS


On First Peoples: Asia, scientists explore Homo sapien migration out of Africa and into Asia. Much like modern humans, it was curiosity that drove them to explore new river valleys and make their way into a new continent. Continue


First Peoples: Australia

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First Peoples
PBS


When humans arrived in Australia, they were, for the first time, truly alone, surrounded by wildly different flora and fauna. How did they survive and populate a continent? There is a close cultural and genetic link between early Australians and modern-day Aborigines; here the ancient and modern story intersect as nowhere else. Continue


First Peoples: Americas

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First Peoples
PBS


As early humans spread out across the world, their toughest challenge was colonizing the Americas because a huge ice sheet blocked the route. It has long been thought that the first Americans were Clovis people, who arrived 13,000 years ago. But an underwater discovery in Mexico suggests people arrived earlier — coming by boat, not on foot. Continue


Life on the Reef Preview

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Life on the Reef
PBS


The Great Barrier Reef is home to a stunning array of animals, from microscopic plankton to 100-ton whales. From the coral cays of the outer reef to the Islands of the Torres Strait, the reef's human residents work to find that critical balance between our needs and those of an ever-diminishing natural world. Premieres Wednesday, July 22, 2015 at 8 p.m. ET. Check your local listings. Continue


What Lives in Cheese?

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Gross Science
PBS


What makes cheese so delicious? It's the bacteria, fungi, mites, and maggots living in it. Continue


DNA-Testing Reef Diversity

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NOVA
PBS


Marine biologist Laetitia Plaisance investigates species diversity in two coral reefs and receives some sobering news. Continue


An Impossible Task

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First Peoples
PBS


Scientists from the Max Planck Institute, a leader in the study of ancient DNA, were the first to crack the genetic code of a Neanderthal. On First Peoples: Europe, Swedish geneticist Svante Paabo describes the challenges faced in reconstructing DNA from millions of degraded genome fragments found in a Neanderthal bone. Continue


The First Modern European

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First Peoples
PBS


Deep inside a Romanian cave, archaeologist Joao Zilhao and his team uncover a modern human, amongst the bones of prehistoric bears. On First Peoples: Europe, Zilhao describes the "extreme archeaology" needed to examine the cave. Continue


My Ancestors

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First Peoples
PBS


There is a close cultural and genetic link between early Australians and modern-day Aborigines; here the ancient and modern story intersect as nowhere else. Continue


The Denisovans – A New Type of Human Discovered by Genetics

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First Peoples
PBS


On First Peoples: Asia, geneticist Svante Paabo uncovers a new branch of the human family tree; the Denisovans. Named after the Siberian cave where the single finger bone was found, these early humans were previously undiscovered. Continue


The Secret to Our Success - Connectivity

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First Peoples
PBS


200,000 years ago, a new species, Homo sapiens, appeared on the African landscape. While scientists have long imagined eastern Africa as a real-life Garden of Eden, the latest research suggests humans evolved in many places across the continent at the same time. Continue


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