chasing the dream

  • July 19, 2017  

    Spending on social welfare programs like SNAP, also known as food stamps, would be dramatically cut under the White House budget unveiled in May. In Arkansas, a state that mirrors the national picture, 14 percent of the population was on food stamps last year. How would a cut affect poor families, the state’s budget and even local grocery stores? Special correspondent Cat Wise reports. Continue reading

  • FILE PHOTO: A job seeker talks to an exhibitor at the Colorado Hospital Association health care career fair in Denver
    June 4, 2017  

    At 4.3 percent, the unemployment rate is at its lowest level since 2001. But left out of this figure are people who are working part time or fewer hours than they desire — – the underemployed. NewsHour Weekend’s Christopher Booker reports on how the underemployed are struggling in the U.S. economy. This is part of an ongoing series of reports called “Chasing the Dream,” which reports on poverty and opportunity in America. Continue reading

  • Coal mining boots are shown above miners' lockers before the start of an afternoon shift at a coal mine near Gilbert, West Virginia May 22, 2014. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith/File Photo GLOBAL BUSINESS WEEK AHEAD PACKAGE - SEARCH 'BUSINESS WEEK AHEAD MAY 2' FOR ALL IMAGES - RTX2CDIO
    April 24, 2017  

    Seventy years ago, President Truman forged a deal where coal companies and the union agreed to fund lifelong health care pensions. The government never intended to pay for these benefits, but Congress has become a funder of last resort. Now some 22,000 retired union miners and their widows will lose their health care if Congress doesn’t act. Lisa Desjardins reports from West Virginia. Continue reading

  • Wider Image - Ferguson - Points Of Protest
    April 23, 2017  

    Some of the fiercest political battles are taking place between Democratic-controlled cities and Republican-led state legislatures over issues like minimum wage and plastic bag bans. Increasingly, those issues are decided through a political maneuver called preemption, when state lawmakers write laws that prevent cities from enforcing their local ordinances. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Chris Bury reports from Missouri. This is part of an ongoing series of reports called ‘Chasing the Dream,’ which reports on poverty and opportunity in America. Continue reading

  • October 29, 2016  

    Like other states, South Carolina has seen its traditional industries decimated by automation and globalization, as low-skilled factory jobs disappeared or migrated to low-cost labor countries. Now, the state is building a robust, high-skilled factory base, returning manufacturing jobs to the state. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Patricia Sabga reports. This is part of an ongoing series of reports called “Chasing the Dream,” which reports on poverty and opportunity in America.” Continue reading

  • October 20, 2016  

    In rural Wilkesboro, North Carolina, nearly a quarter of residents live in poverty, well above the national rate. Residents there say their needs and concerns are not being discussed in the national political dialogue, which means for some, they won’t vote at all. Lisa Desjardins reports. Continue reading

  • October 18, 2016  

    In Nevada, a split in the Republican party is fueling a tight Senate race. Republican Joe Heck’s voter support declined after he withdrew his support for presidential candidate Donald Trump, creating an especially tight battle between Heck and Democrat Catherine Cortez Masto. John Yang reports from the battleground state on the issues that matter to voters there. Continue reading

  • September 25, 2016  

    In 2015, Gravity Payments CEO Dan Price announced he would raise the company’s minimum wage to $70,000 a year by 2017 and slash his own compensation by more than 90 percent. More than a year later, Price reports the company’s revenue and clientele has grown substantially, despite critics’ predictions that the move would be bad for business. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent John Larson reports. Continue reading

  • September 16, 2016  

    Trumbull is one of Ohio’s most reliably Democratic counties. But Republican nominee Donald Trump has paid special attention to the region and voters have listened to his message about the economy. John Yang speaks with some voters who see the New York millionaire as someone who can improve prospects for working class Americans. Continue reading

  • August 27, 2016  

    Both presidential nominees Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump pledged to bring manufacturing jobs back to American shores as the economy became a central theme in this year’s presidential elections. But some jobs, once thought to be forever lost to cheaper labor overseas, have already started to return. NewsHour Weekend’s Christopher Booker has the story. Continue reading

Page 1 of 4123Last »