chasing the dream

  • October 29, 2016  

    Like other states, South Carolina has seen its traditional industries decimated by automation and globalization, as low-skilled factory jobs disappeared or migrated to low-cost labor countries. Now, the state is building a robust, high-skilled factory base, returning manufacturing jobs to the state. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Patricia Sabga reports. This is part of an ongoing series of reports called “Chasing the Dream,” which reports on poverty and opportunity in America.” Continue reading

  • October 20, 2016  

    In rural Wilkesboro, North Carolina, nearly a quarter of residents live in poverty, well above the national rate. Residents there say their needs and concerns are not being discussed in the national political dialogue, which means for some, they won’t vote at all. Lisa Desjardins reports. Continue reading

  • October 18, 2016  

    In Nevada, a split in the Republican party is fueling a tight Senate race. Republican Joe Heck’s voter support declined after he withdrew his support for presidential candidate Donald Trump, creating an especially tight battle between Heck and Democrat Catherine Cortez Masto. John Yang reports from the battleground state on the issues that matter to voters there. Continue reading

  • September 25, 2016  

    In 2015, Gravity Payments CEO Dan Price announced he would raise the company’s minimum wage to $70,000 a year by 2017 and slash his own compensation by more than 90 percent. More than a year later, Price reports the company’s revenue and clientele has grown substantially, despite critics’ predictions that the move would be bad for business. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent John Larson reports. Continue reading

  • September 16, 2016  

    Trumbull is one of Ohio’s most reliably Democratic counties. But Republican nominee Donald Trump has paid special attention to the region and voters have listened to his message about the economy. John Yang speaks with some voters who see the New York millionaire as someone who can improve prospects for working class Americans. Continue reading

  • August 27, 2016  

    Both presidential nominees Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump pledged to bring manufacturing jobs back to American shores as the economy became a central theme in this year’s presidential elections. But some jobs, once thought to be forever lost to cheaper labor overseas, have already started to return. NewsHour Weekend’s Christopher Booker has the story. Continue reading

  • August 11, 2016   BY  

    In 1976, Atlantic City, NJ — long an iconic seaside resort and home to a legendary boardwalk — became the first location outside Nevada to legalize casinos. But by 2014, four of Atlantic City’s twelve casinos had closed, costing nearly 8,000 people their jobs. Continue reading

  • April 16, 2016  

    Youngstown, Ohio is an upper-midwest city that has come to symbolize the nation’s distress of deindustrialization with high unemployment and crime rates. But after decades of decline, the city has plans to rebuild, remove blight and attract employers. On issues of poverty and opportunity in America, this is part of an ongoing series of reports called “Chasing the Dream.” Continue reading

  • March 26, 2016  

    Due to low federal minimum wages for tipped workers, many grapple with poverty rates. Seven states, however, pay tipped workers full minimum wage before tips. And with minimum-wage hikes looming, some restaurants are pioneering no-tipping policies, eliminating gratuities in favor of higher hourly wages for workers. NewsHour’s Alison Stewart reports. Continue reading

  • March 26, 2016   BY and  

    Some people tip to show off. Some people tip to help the server. Others tip out of a sense of duty. Michael Lynn of Cornell University’s School of Hotel Administration weighs in on the psychology behind tipping in America. Continue reading

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