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who's responsble for improving security?

who do we blame for the system's flawsarrow
There's no agreement on who ultimately should be--can be--held liable when networked systems go down and damage is done. Should the government step in and regulate? Is it up to individual computer users and companies to stay on top of technology and take necessary security precautions? Should we blame the software industry for selling insecure products? Here are some opinions on this thorny issue, taken from FRONTLINE's interviews with Robert Giovagnoni, Exec V.P. of iDEFENSE; Richard Power, Editorial Dir. of Computer Security Institute; Burce Schweier, author of Digital Security in a Networked World; Martha Stansell-Gamm, chief of the U.S. Justice Dept.'s Computer Crime section; and Robert Steele, CEO of Open Source Solutions.
are software companies irresponsibile?arrow
Many hackers and security experts blame most of the Internet's insecurities on software manufacturers like Microsoft who they say place profits ahead of security and rush flawed products to market before they've been sufficiently tested.

Here are some experts weighing in on the software makers' obligations, the corrective steps being currently implemented, and the challenges of balancing computer convenience vs. security: Howard Schmidt of Microsoft; Richard Power of Computer Security Institute; James Christy, computer crime investigator for the U.S. Dept. of Defense; Bruce Schneier, author of Digital Security in a Networked World; and hackers Reid and Count Zero.

the pernicious characteristics of monoculturesarrow
In this essay, information management expert Paul Strassmann argues that the "monoculture" of Microsoft's systems software, and the company's recently announced .Net initiative poses a threat to national security and to the reliability of a computer based society.
microsoft respondsarrow
In this Microsoft response to the above essay, the authors say Strassmann's critique is based on a fundamentally flawed assumption as well as erroneous analyses of computer security issues.
computer crime lawsarrow
Here's an overview of state and federal laws pertaining to computer crime.


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