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Ten questions on America's pro-marriage movement and the dramatic changes in the institution of marriage since the 1960s.

1. As with Oklahoma (a focus in FRONTLINE's report "Let's Get Married"), several states and communities in the U.S. have set public goals since the mid-1990s to reduce high rates of divorce and strengthen marriage. On the following list, which state has not taken such an initiative?

Arizona

Florida

Washington state

New Jersey

Michigan

2. How many states have introduced covenant marriage laws to help strengthen marriage?

7

19

27

36

3. How many births in the U.S. are out-of-wedlock?

One-third

One-fourth

One-half

One-fifth

4. How many out-of-wedlock births in the United States are to couples who are living together, but are not married?

25%

35%

40%

50%

5. Which one of the following industrialized countries has a higher out-of-wedlock birth rate than the U.S. rate of 33%?

Japan

Greece

Germany

United Kingdom

6. What are the odds that a marriage started today in the U.S. will end in a divorce?

30%

45%

50%

55%

7. In terms of divorce rates, how does Oklahoma rank compared to other states? (Note: Oklahoma was a focus in FRONTLINE's report "Let's Get Married" because it has launched a $10 million initiative to strengthen marriages and reduce the divorce rate.)

Second

Third

Fifth

Eighth

8. In the U.S. what has been the percentage decline since 1950 in the marriage rate of unmarried women between the ages of 15 and 44?

Over 40%

Over 35%

Over 50%

Over 60%

9. Half of those who remarry after a divorce from a first marriage do so within:

A year and a half

Three years

Five years

Seven years

10. Which of the following is not true?

Puerto Rican couples who have children out of wedlock are more likely to be living together than white or black couples who have children out of wedlock.

70% of African-American children are born out of wedlock.

Debate continues among social scientists and policy experts on whether having parents who are married is important to a child's well being.

The majority of U.S. children today will live either in a single-parent household or a step-parent household during some point in their childhood.


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