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A look at the accounting industry's political donations from 1990 to today, with data drawn from the non-profit and non-partisan Center for Responsive Politics.

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The Accounting Industry and Campaign Money

According to the Center for Responsive Politics, the accounting industry gave more than $50 million dollars in federal campaign contributions during the 1990s, with 56 percent going to Republicans and 43 percent going to Democrats. So far in the 2002 election cycle, the industry has made $5,298,849 in contributions, with 72 percent going to Republicans and 28 percent to Democrats.

Below is a chart of accounting industry contribution trends from 1990 to today, followed by a breakdown of industry campaign contributions to Congress during the big three accounting battles of the decade, and the 2000 presidential election.

[NOTE: All data is from OpenSecrets.org, the Web site of the Center for Responsive Politics, a non-partisan, non-profit research group in Washington, D.C. that tracks money in politics.]

1990-2002: FEDERAL CAMPAIGN CONTRIBUTION TRENDS

Election Cycle Total Contributions Amt. to Democrats Amt. to Republicans % to Democrats % to Republicans
1990 $3,098,764 $1,553,042 $1,544,722 50% 50%
1992 $6,338,182 $3,399,397 $2,920,446 54% 46%
1994 $6,922,476 $3,490,177 $3,411,399 50% 49%
1996 $11,169,445 $4,561,535 $6,570,390 41% 59%
1998 $9,341,295 $3,617,141 $5,672,081 39% 61%
2000 $14,705,429 $5,631,400 $8,961,847 38% 61%
2002 $5,298,849 $1,480,893 $3,794,473 28% 72%
TOTAL $56,874,440 $23,733,585 $32,875,358 42% 58%

2001-2002: TOP CONTRIBUTORS

In the current election cycle, the accounting industry has contributed $5,298,849, with the majority of donations coming from the Big Five accounting firms and the industry trade association, the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA). Here is a breakdown of their contributions.

Rank Organization Amount % to Democrats % to Republicans
1 Ernst & Young $869,487 32% 68%
2 Deloitte & Touche $750,734 25% 75%
3 KPMGLLP $709,329 19% 81%
4 PricewaterhouseCoopers $624,001 19% 81%
5 Andersen $591,789 30% 70%
6 AICPA $334,332 26% 74%

CONGRESSIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS

1993-1994 Election Cycle: Contributions to Members of Congress

House # Members Avg. Contribution Total Contributions
Democrats 219 $8,215 $1,799,021
Republicans 165 $8,800 $1,452,042
Independents 1 $500 $500
TOTAL 385 $8,446 $3,251,563

[NOTE: The House of Representatives has 435 members]

Top Ten Recipients

Rick Santorum (R-Pa.) -- $84,324
W.J. "Billy" Tauzin (D-La.) -- $71,200
Jack M. Fields Jr. (R-Texas) -- $52,550
Dave McCurdy (D-Okla.) -- $50,900
Jon Kyl (R-Ariz.) -- $42,800
Jim Cooper (D-Tenn.) -- $41,346
Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) -- $38,793
E. Clay Shaw, Jr. (R-Fla.) -- $34,652
Collin Peterson (D-Minn.) -- $32,200
Richard Gephardt (D-Mo.) -- $28,250


Senate # Members Avg. Contribution Total Contributions
Democrats 44 $17,516 $770,686
Republicans 29 $16,904 $490,215
Independents 0 $0 $0
TOTAL 73 $17,273 $1,260,901

[NOTE: The Senate has 100 members]

Top Ten Recipients

Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-Texas) -- $109,085
Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.) -- $77,600
Jim Sasser (D-Tenn.) -- $64,650
Joseph Lieberman (D-Conn.) -- $62,100
Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J) -- $60,137
Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) -- $58,300
Paul Sarbanes (D-Md.) -- $53,350
Slade Gorton (R-Wash.) -- $43,630
Kent Conrad (D-N.D.) -- $41,527
Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D-N.Y.) -- $41,500

1995-1996 Election Cycle: Contributions to Members of Congress

House # Members Avg. Contribution Total Contributions
Democrats 168 $9,461 $1,589,484
Republicans 228 $10,735 $2,447,480
Independents 0 $0 $0
TOTAL 396 $10,194 $4,036,964

Top Ten Recipients

Martin Frost (D-Texas) -- $82,000
Dick Zimmer (R-N.J.) -- $72,389
Vic Fazio (D-Calif.) -- $69,900
Robert Torricelli (D-N.J.) -- $62,350
Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) -- $60,300
W.J. "Billy" Tauzin (R-La.) -- $56,000
Peter Deutsch (D-Fla.) -- $54,500
Christopher Cox (R-Calif.) -- $49,650
Wayne Allard (R-Colo.) -- $47,030
Jack Reed (D-R.I.) -- $46,450


Senate # Members Avg. Contribution Total Contributions
Democrats 26 $31,127 $809,305
Republicans 45 $35,358 $1,591,096
Independents 0 $0 $0
TOTAL 71 $33,808 $2,400,401

Top Ten Recipients

Bob Dole (R-Kan.) -- $428,732
Christopher Dodd (D-Conn.) -- $244,633
Phil Gramm (R-Texas) -- $190,750
Alfonse D'Amato (R-N.Y.) -- $178,825
Pete Domenici (R-N.M.) -- $76,534
Fred Thompson (R-Tenn.) -- $69,144
Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) -- $67,020
John Kerry (D-Mass.) -- $64,475
Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) -- $61,336
Max Baucus (D-Mont.) -- $61,000

1999-2000 Election Cycle: Contributions to Members of Congress

House # Members Avg. Contribution Total Contributions
Democrats 191 $9,679 $1,848,725
Republicans 217 $12,213 $2,650,117
Independents 1 $13,250 $13,250
TOTAL 409 $11,032 $4,512,092

Top Ten Recipients

Brad Sherman (D-Calif.) -- $64,750
E. Clay Shaw, Jr. (R-Fla.) -- $62,070
Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) -- $52,749
Martin Frost (D-Texas) -- $52,248
Thomas M. Davis, III (R-Va.) -- $51,861
Ellen Tauscher (D-Calif.) -- $50,521
Edolphus Towns (D-N.Y.) -- $47,200
Anne Northup (R-Ky.) -- $47,095
Donald L. Sherwood (R-Pa.) -- $46,036
Michael G. Oxley (R-Ohio) -- $42,000


Senate # Members Avg. Contribution Total Contributions
Democrats 36 $25,184 $906,636
Republicans 41 $23,357 $957,634
Independents 0 $0 $0
TOTAL 77 $24,211 $1,864,270

Top Ten Recipients

Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) -- $185,006
John McCain (R-Ariz.) -- $147,895
Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-N.Y.) -- $117,815
George Allen (R-Va.) -- $83,168
John Ensign (R-Nev.) -- $74,636
Mike DeWine (R-Ohio) -- $66,720
Rick Santorum (R-Pa.) -- $65,647
Christopher Dodd (D-Conn.) -- $65,000
Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) -- $58,724
Jon Kyl (R-Ariz.) -- $57,077

ACCOUNTING INDUSTRY: 2000 PRESIDENTIAL CONTRIBUTIONS

During the 2000 presidential campaign, the accounting industry campaign contributions were weighted heavily to candidate George W. Bush. Three out of his top ten contributors were accounting firms, with Ernst & Young ranking number four ($179,949); Andersen Worldwide ranking number five ($145,650) and PriceWaterhouseCoopers ranking number eight ($127,798). Only one accounting firm ranked on Al Gore's top ten: Ernst & Young was his largest contributor ($134,925).

1999-2000 Election Cycle:

Rank Candidate Party Affiliation Amount
1 George W. Bush Republican $1,110,604
2 Al Gore Democrat $399,580
3 Bill Bradley Democrat $352,000
4 Dan Quayle Republican $29,000
5 Elizabeth Dole Republican $25,200
6 Lamar Alexander Republican $20,545
7 Gary Bauer Republican $17,135
8 Steve Forbes Republican $16,550
9 Pat Buchanan Reform $16,430
10 Alan Keyes Republican $14,800

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