Gun violence in America shows no sign of slowing after new spate of mass shootings

From Indiana to Texas to Florida and many other places, communities, families and individuals are coping today with the aftermath of violence that remains all too routine amid the continuing epidemic of shootings and gun-related deaths in America. Amna Nawaz reports on the latest gun violence.

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  • Amna Nawaz:

    Let's return now to our top story, the continuing epidemic of shootings and gun-related deaths in America.

    From Indiana to Texas to Florida and many other places, communities, families and individuals are coping today with the aftermath of violence that remains all too routine.

    Gun violence in America shows no sign of slowing, as the nation faced another weekend of mass shootings. Sunday evening, at an Indianapolis mall, an alleged gunman identified as 20-year-old Jonathan Sapirman shot and killed three people and injured two more. Police say an armed civilian then shot and killed the gunman.

  • Jim Ison, Greenwood, Indiana, Police Chief:

    Many more people would have died last night if not for a responsible armed citizen that took action very quickly, within the first two minutes of the shooting.

  • Amna Nawaz:

    The Gun Violence Archive reports 15 mass shootings this weekend in which four or more people were shot. They count more than 350 so far this year.

    On Sunday, new details from Uvalde, Texas, revealed — quote — "systemic failures" in response to the shooting at Robb Elementary School. The 77-page report from a Texas House committee found nearly 400 local state and federal officers were on scene. But with no clear leadership, they — quote — "failed to prioritize saving the lives of innocent victims over their own safety."

  • State Rep. Dustin Burrows (R-TX):

    The training and standards we set for officers is if you know there's active shooting, active killing going on or if somebody is dying, the standard is, you have to continue to do something to stop that killing or stop that dying.

    That day, several officers in the hallway or in that building knew or should have known there was dying in that classroom. And they should have done more, acted with urgency.

  • Amna Nawaz:

    Little solace for the grieving families in Uvalde.

    Sergio Garcia's 9-year-old son, Uziyah, was one of the 19 children killed.

    Sergio Garcia, Father of Shooting Victim: Whatever I see in this report is not going to bring my son back. But we need to prevent it so it — somebody else won't lose their daughter, their kids. This needs to be the last time this happens to a school.

  • Amna Nawaz:

    Meanwhile, the ripple effects of gun violence continue across other American communities. In Florida today, opening statements in the death penalty trial of the gunman in the 2018 Parkland High School shooting.

    The prosecution began to make its case.

  • Michael J. Satz, Florida Prosecutor:

    The murders, all 17, were heinous, atrocious and cruel. All 17 were cold calculated and premeditated.

  • Amna Nawaz:

    Also today, in Buffalo, New York, the gunman who allegedly killed 10 Black people at a grocery store was arraigned on federal hate crime charges.

    In Highland Park, Illinois today, the final funeral for the victims of the July 4 parade shooting, just one of the many communities still in mourning and waiting for justice to be served.

    Well, this afternoon, the Texas State Police announced it would do its own review after the Uvalde report laid out systemic failures and detailed — quote — "egregiously poor decision-making by law enforcement." It found 376 officers responded that day, representing 20 different agencies.

    Yet there was a lack of effective incident command. And it was unclear who was in charge. The report also outlines how school staff developed a sense of complacency with safety protocols, leaving doors unlocked or propped open for convenience.

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