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map - the reach of meth

Since it's first incarnation as a niche drug among West Coast biker gangs, methamphetamine has reached every state in the nation, and its effect on families and communities has been devastating. There are now more than 1.4 million meth users in the United States today, and that number continues to rise. The map below shows the severity of the epidemic in all 50 states based on the number of meth users admitted for drug treatment per 100,000 residents in 2003, the most recent year for which nationwide data is available.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. In addition, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General. (Switch to the graphical version of this map.)

ALABAMA

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 38

Methamphetamine is currently the primary drug threat facing Alabama. In 2004, 1,490 residents sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 10.1 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment. Although this is a decrease from 2003, when 1,713 individuals sought treatment for meth addiction, it is a dramatic increase from 2000, when only 496 did. The majority of meth in circulation in Alabama is provided by Mexican traffickers; however, local production of the drug is on the rise: In 2004, a record 385 labs were seized by DEA, state and local authorities, compared to 289 in 2003 and just 83 in 2000. According to drug enforcement reports, the increase in small-town thefts, violent assaults, and burglaries in the state can be directly tied to this increase in meth use.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. Also, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General. In addition to the federal minimums, Alabama state law requires that purchasers of these products be at least 18 years old and be limited to 6 grams every 30 days.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

ALASKA

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 11

Methamphetamine, particularly crystal meth, is a small but growing threat in Alaska, though marijuana is more widely abused. In 2003, 70 individuals sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 1.7 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment. Although this is a decrease from 2002, when 80 individuals sought treatment for meth abuse, it is an increase from 2000 when only 53 did. Meanwhile, the availability of locally-produced meth is on the rise: In 2004, a record 66 labs were seized by DEA, state and local authorities, compared to 35 in 2003 and just 15 in 2001.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. In addition, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

ARIZONA

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 29

Arizona is a major distribution hub for the shipment of Mexican-made methamphetamine to U.S. markets, particularly to states in the Midwest, and most of the meth in local circulation originates from Mexico rather than from clandestine labs. In fact, until recently, lab seizures were sharply in decline in Arizona: From a high of 389 seizures in 2000, they fell to 122 in 2004. However, during that same period, Arizona has seen the number of individuals seeking treatment for meth addiction quintuple: from 614 people in 2000 to 3,301 in 2004 (or about 8.9 percent of all individuals seeking treatment for substance abuse).

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. In addition, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

ARKANSAS

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 110

In the past decade, methamphetamine has surpassed all other drugs as the primary drug of abuse in Arkansas; it is now the state's biggest drug threat. In 2004, 2,992 Arkansans sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 21.8 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment, and this number has remained consistent for the past three years. Mexican-produced meth regularly makes its way into Arkansas drug markets, and the state's rural landscape provides an ideal home for a large number of local manufacturers. The number of clandestine labs seized by drug enforcement officials appears to nearly double every two years, from 242 in 2000 to 460 in 2002 and finally to 800 in 2004. In 2004, twice as many labs were seized in Arkansas as were seized in neighboring Texas, a state with a population more than ten times as large.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. Also, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General. In addition to the federal minimums, Arkansas state law limits purchases of these products to 7.5 grams every 30 days and stipulates that sellers must be pharmacists or pharmacy technicians.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

CALIFORNIA

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 175

Methamphetamine has surpassed cocaine as the biggest drug threat in California, and the Drug Enforcement Administration describes northern part of the state as "awash" in the drug. For more than a decade, meth has been manufactured locally as well as smuggled into the state from Mexico, although recent years have seen a decrease in local lab seizures. In 2004, only 764 labs were seized by DEA, state and local authorities, compared to 1,239 in 2003 and 2,204 in 2000. On the other hand, the number of individuals seeking treatment for meth addiction has risen dramatically from 32,970 in 2000 to 59,714 in 2004, or about 33.1 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment and a population as large as the entire city of Palo Alto, Calif.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. Also, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General. In addition to the federal minimums, California state law requires that purchasers of these products be at least 18 years old.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

COLORADO

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 72

Methamphetamine use has grown in Colorado in recent years, although marijuana is still the most commonly abused drug in the state. In 2004, 4,778 residents sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 7.0 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment. This is a steady increase from 2002, when 2,582 individuals sought treatment for meth abuse, and from 2000, when 1,782 did. Most meth circulating in the state now comes from superlabs in California or Mexico, and local production is on the decline: In 2004, some 228 labs were seized by DEA, state and local authorities, compared to 345 in 2003 and 453 in 2002.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. In addition, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

CONNECTICUT

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 3

Connecticut's location on the East Coast has, so far, insulated it from the spread of the West Coast's epidemic, and methamphetamine remains an obscure problem in the state. Heroin has surpassed crack cocaine as Connecticut's biggest drug threat, and it far eclipses meth. In 2003, some 17,609 individuals sought treatment for a heroin addiction (or about 38.5 percent of people seeking substance abuse treatment); while only 114 (or about 0.2 percent) sought treatment for a meth addiction. Similarly, only two clandestine labs have been seized in Connecticut since 2000. Despite the current lack of symptoms of meth abuse in the state, Connecticut is not immune to this epidemic; it takes many years before the effects of the drug can be fully measured.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. In addition, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

DELAWARE

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 2

Delaware's location on the East Coast has, so far, insulated it from the spread of the West Coast's epidemic, and methamphetamine remains an obscure problem in the state. Currently, heroin is Delaware's biggest drug threat, and it far eclipses meth. In 2004, 2,118 residents sought treatment for a heroin addiction (or about 26.9 percent of people seeking substance abuse treatment), while only 18 (or about 0.2 percent) sought treatment for a meth addiction. Similarly, only six clandestine labs have been seized in the state since 2000. Despite the current lack of symptoms of meth abuse in the state, Delaware is not immune to this epidemic; it takes many years before the effects of the drug can be fully measured.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. Also, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General. In addition to the federal minimums, Delaware state law requires that purchasers of these products be at least 18 years old.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

FLORIDA

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 6

In recent years, methamphetamine has become a major concern among drug enforcement officials in Florida. Although the majority of meth in circulation in the state is still provided by Mexican traffickers, local production is on the rise: In 2004, a record 276 labs were seized by DEA, state and local authorities, compared to 133 in 2002 and just 15 in 2000. Florida has also experienced a similar surge in the number of individuals seeking treatment for meth addiction: from 420 in 2000 to 1,062 in 2004. However, the latter figure only represents 1.6 percent of the individuals admitted for drug treatment.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. In addition, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

GEORGIA

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 32

Methamphetamine has increased in popularity in Georgia in recent years, particularly in the state's major metropolitan areas. Although Mexican cartels continue to traffic meth into the state, state drug officials have been alarmed by the rise in the number of local meth labs. In 2004, 261 clandestine labs were seized by DEA, state and local authorities, compared to 131 in 2002 and just 54 in 2000. And in 2004, some 2,886 Georgians sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 9.2 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment. Although this is less than the number of people seeking treatment for cocaine (7,547) or alcohol (11,162), it represents a dramatic increase from 2002, when only 1,588 sought treatment, and from 2000, when only 630 did.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. In addition, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

HAWAII

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 204

Methamphetamine, specifically crystal meth, is the drug of choice in Hawaii, and the state has the second highest number of meth users per capita in the nation, a factor that experts pinpoint as a major cause of the state's high rate of property crime. In 2004, 2,380 residents sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 41.0 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment. Although this is a slight decrease from 2003, when 2,561 individuals sought treatment for meth abuse, the number has remained fairly steady for the past five years. Currently, the majority of meth in circulation in Hawaii is smuggled onto the islands from the U.S. mainland or from east Asian superlabs, however, there have been a handful of local seizures as well: from 5 in 2000 to 10 in 2002 and now 20 in 2004.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. In addition, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

IDAHO

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 60

Methamphetamine is currently the biggest drug threat facing Idaho and the most widely abused drug in the state. In 2003, 818 residents sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 26.2 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment. Mexican traffickers currently provide most of the meth in circulation in the state, while local production has dropped off significantly: In 2004, the DEA, state and local authorities seized only 42 clandestine labs, compared to a high of 131 in 2001.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. In addition, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

ILLINOIS

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 17

Methamphetamine is the primary drug of concern in the rural areas of Illinois, although it has not yet made significant inroads into the more urban population centers. In 2003, 2,135 residents sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 2.5 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment. Although many more individuals sought treatment for a cocaine or heroin addiction, this figure represents a increase from 2002, when 1,540 individuals sought treatment for meth abuse, and a dramatic increase from 2000 when only 556 did. The local production of meth is also on the rise: In 2004 a record 1,058 clandestine labs were seized by DEA, state and local authorities, compared to 553 in 2002 and just 125 in 2000.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. Also, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General. In addition to the federal minimums, Illinois state law requires that purchasers of these products be at least 18 years old and be limited to 6 grams every 30 days. State law also stipulates that sellers must be pharmacists or pharmcay technicians.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

INDIANA

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 23

Methamphetamine use and production continue to increase in Indiana every year. In 2004, 1,967 residents sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 5.2 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment. This is dramatic increase from 2002, when 1,167 individuals sought treatment for meth, and from 2000, when only 673 did. Although Mexican traffickers provide the majority of meth in circulation within the state, the smaller local labs produce meth of higher purity, and their number is on the rise. In 2004, a record 1,074 labs were seized by DEA, state and local authorities, compared to 722 in 2002 and just 362 in 2000.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. Also, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General. In addition to the federal minimums, Indiana state law requires that purchasers of these products be at least 18 years old and be limited to 6 grams every 30 days.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

IOWA

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 181

Iowa is one of the states most ravaged by the meth epidemic, and it has the third highest rate of per capita meth treatment admissions in the nation. In 2004, 5,560 Iowans sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 19.7 percent of all persons seeking substance treatment. This is a steady increase from 2002, when 4,840 individuals sought treatment for meth abuse and from 2000 when only 3,383 did. Although the majority of meth in circulation in Iowa is provided by Mexican traffickers, local production is on the rise: In 2004 a record 1,335 labs were seized by DEA, state and local authorities, compared to 867 in 2002 and just 283 in 2000.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. Also, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General. In addition to the federal minimums, Iowa state law limits purchases of these products to 7.5 grams every 30 days and stipulates that sellers must be pharmacists or pharmacy technicians.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

KANSAS

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 54

Methamphetamine is the primary drug of concern in Kansas, and treatment admissions for meth have steadily increased while admissions for cocaine, heroin, and marijuana have decreased. In 2004, 1,796 residents sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 11.9 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment. This is an increase from 2002, when 1,384 individuals sought treatment for meth abuse, and from 2000 when only 922 did. Although the majority of meth in circulation in Kansas is provided by Mexican traffickers, local production continues, fluctuating from 644 lab seizures in 2000 to a record 879 in 2001 and back down to 584 for 2004.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. Also, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General. In addition to the federal minimums, Kansas state law requires that sellers of these products be pharmacists or pharmacy technicians.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

KENTUCKY

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 17

Methamphetamine is a dramatically increasing threat in Kentucky, particularly in the rural areas of the state where local production of the drug is rampant. In 2004 a record 571 labs were seized by DEA, state and local authorities, compared to 371 in 2002 and just 104 in 2000. Similarly, in 2003, 696 residents sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 2.2 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment. This is an increase from 2002, when 455 individuals sought treatment for meth abuse, and from 2000 when only 250 did.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. Also, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General. In addition to the federal minimums, Kentucky state law requires that purchasers of these products be at least 18 years old and stipulates that sellers must be pharmacists or pharmacy technicians.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

LOUISIANA

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 18

Methamphetamine is currently the fastest growing drug problem in Louisiana. Although more residents seek treatment for cocaine or marijuana abuse, the number of residents seeking treatment for a meth addiction is on the rise: from only 355 in 2000 to a record 1,084 in 2004, or about 3.8 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment. While the majority of meth in circulation in Louisiana is produced in Mexico or the southwestern United States, local production is also on the rise: In 2004, DEA, state and local authorities seized 123 clandestine laboratories, compared to just 15 in 2000.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. In addition, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

MAINE

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 4

Methamphetamine is not yet a major drug threat in Maine, although its rural landscape makes it ripe for exploitation by manufacturers of the drug. In 2004, only 59 residents sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 0.5 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment. Meth treatment admissions have increased in recent years but not on a dramatic scale. The meth that is currently in circulation is produced primarily by out-of-state traffickers; only seven clandestine labs have been seized by drug enforcement officials within the past five years. Despite the current lack of symptoms of meth abuse in the state, Maryland is not immune to this epidemic; it takes many years before the effects of the drug can be fully measured.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. Also, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General. In addition to the federal minimums, Maine state law requires that sellers of these products be pharmacists or pharmacy technicians.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

MARYLAND

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 3

Maryland's location on the East Coast has insulated it, so far, from the spread of the West Coast's epidemic, and methamphetamine is not in high demand or widely available throughout the state. Heroin is, by far, Maryland's biggest drug threat, and it far eclipses meth. In 2004, 18, 205 residents sought treatment for a heroin addiction (or about 30.4 percent of people seeking substance abuse treatment), while only 129 (or about 0.2 percent) sought treatment for a meth addiction. Similarly, only six clandestine labs have been seized in the state since 2000, although one of them was large enough to rank as a "super lab. " Despite the current lack of symptoms of meth abuse in the state, Maryland is not immune to this epidemic; it takes many years before the effects of the drug can be fully measured.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. In addition, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

MASSACHUSETTS

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 2

Methamphetamine is a small but growing problem in Massachusetts, though heroin and cocaine continue to be the primary drug threats. In 2004, only 113 residents sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 0.2 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment, compared to 24,945 for heroin (45.9 percent) and 3,300 (or 6.1 percent) for all forms of cocaine. However, the treatment admissions for meth over recent years reveal a steady increase in abuse: In 2000, only 70 individuals sought treatment, compared to 113 in 2004. Currently, local production of the drug remains minimal; DEA, state and local authorities have recorded only three lab seizures in the state in the past five years.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. In addition, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

MICHIGAN

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 6

Methamphetamine continues to remain a major drug threat in Michigan, although more individuals seek treatment for cocaine and heroin abuse, and marijuana is still the most commonly abused drug in the state. In 2004, 571 residents sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 1.3 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment. However, this number represents a steady increase from 2002, when 430 individuals sought treatment for meth abuse, and from 2000, when only 179 did. Local production of meth has also seen a dramatic increase: In 2004 a record 295 labs were seized by DEA, state and local authorities, compared to 228 in 2002 and just 21 in 2000.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. Also, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General. In addition to the federal minimums, Michigan state law requires that purchasers of these products be at least 18 years old.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

MINNESOTA

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 85

Methamphetamine is a growing threat in Minnesota, where more residents now seek treatment for meth addiction than for any other illicit drug except marijuana. In 2004, 5,886 residents sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 13.0 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment. This is a major increase from 2002, when 3,252 individuals sought treatment for meth abuse, and from 2000 when only 1,698 did. Although the majority of meth in circulation in Minnesota is provided by Mexican traffickers, meth is still being produced in clandestine "mom and pop" labs. In 2004, DEA, state and local officials seized 168 of these labs, a decrease from the high of 301 lab seizures in 2003.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. Also, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General. In addition to the federal minimums, Minnesota state law requires that purchasers of these products be at least 18 years old and limits them to no more than 6 grams every 30 days. State law also stipulates that sellers must be pharmacists or pharmacy technicians.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

MISSISSIPPI

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 19

Although cocaine remains the biggest drug threat in Mississippi, methamphetamine is not far behind. In 2003, 562 residents sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 6.1 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment. This is a dramatic increase from 2000 when only 310 individuals sought treatment for a meth addiction. Mississippi state drug enforcement officials report that the drug was "virtually unheard of" until recently, and is now "approaching epidemic proportions." Accordingly, local production of the drug is on the rise: In 2004, DEA, state and local authorities seized 267 clandestine meth labs, compared to just 126 in 2000.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. In addition, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

MISSOURI

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 70

Methamphetamine remains a major drug threat in Missouri, where locally-produced meth often achieves higher rates of purity than meth produced in Mexico and smuggled into the United States. For the past four years, the state has recorded the highest number of clandestine lab seizures in the nation. In 2004, 2,788 labs were seized by DEA, state and local authorities, compared to just 889 in 2000. Treatment admissions for meth addiction also remain high: In 2004, 4,991 Missourians sought treatment, or about 12.5 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment. This is a steady increase in from 2002 when 4,031 individuals sought treatment for meth abuse and from 2000 when 3,457 did.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. Also, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General. In addition to the federal minimums, Missouri state law requires that purchasers of these products be at least 18 years old.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

MONTANA

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 113

Methamphetamine production and use remains the biggest drug threat in Montana, and the state has one of the highest rates of meth treatment admissions per capita in the nation. In 2004, some 1,146 residents sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 15.5 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment. This is a steady increase from 2002, when 896 individuals sought treatment for meth abuse and from 2000 when 762 did. Although Mexican traffickers provide the majority of meth in circulation in Montana Mexican, local production of the drug remains a problem. In 2004, 65 clandestine labs were seized by DEA, state and local authorities, compared to a high of 88 in 2002 and a low of 28 in 2000.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. In addition, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

NEBRASKA

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 99

Methamphetamine is the biggest drug threat in Nebraska and is currently found in every community in the state. In 2004, a record 2,064 residents sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 13.6 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment. This is steady increase from 2002, when 1,485 individuals sought treatment for meth abuse and from 2000 when only 902 did. Although the majority of meth in circulation in Nebraska is provided by Mexican traffickers, the rural nature of the state makes it a prime location for exploitation by "mom and pop" manufacturers of the drug, who need easy access to anhydrous ammonia, a type of fertilizer often found on farms and a key chimical used in the manufacture of meth. In 2004, 205 clandestine labs were seized by DEA, state and local authorities, compared to a high of 361 in 2002 and a low of 40 in 2000.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. Also, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General. In addition to the federal minimums, Nebraska state law requires that purchasers of these products be at least 18 years old.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

NEVADA

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 145

Methamphetamine is currently the primary drug concern in Nevada, and the state has one of the highest rates of meth treatment admissions per capita in the nation. In 2004, 3,332 residents sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 28.8 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment. There has been a steady increase of admittances in recent years, from 2002 when 2,831 sought treatment and from 2000 when 2,409 did, and Nevada's meth treatment admissions have remained among the highest in the nation for more than a decade. Although, Mexican traffickers provide the majority of meth in circulation in the state, local production has decreased and now occurs on a limited basis. In 2004, DEA, state and local officials seized only 79 clandestine labs, compared to 125 in 2003 and a high of 284 in 2000.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. In addition, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 1

New Hampshire has experienced a continued growth in methamphetamine abuse in recent years, although it currently has one of the lowest rates of of meth treatment admissions per capita in the nation. In 2004, only 30 residents sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 0.5 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment, compared to 742 individuals seeking treatment for heroin. This is a decrease from 2002, when 76 individuals sought treatment for meth abuse, but a steady increase from the 1990s when meth admissions were still in the single digits. Currently, the majority of meth in circulation in New Hampshire is produced in Mexico, and only seven clandestine labs have been seized in the state within the past five years.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. In addition, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

NEW JERSEY

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 2

Heroin remains the most significant drug problem in New Jersey; however, drug enforcement officials report that methamphetamine is gaining in popularity around the state, especially in the Cherry Hill area. In 2004, 187 residents sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 0.4 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment. Although that number is low, it represents a steady increase in meth treatment admissions from 2003, when 131 individuals sought treatment, and from 2000, when only 116 did. Currently, most of the meth in circulation in New Jersey is provided by Filipino or Mexican traffickers, and local production of meth remains scarce: Only 4 meth labs have been seized DEA, state and local authorities in the past five years.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. In addition, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

NEW MEXICO

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 8

New Mexico is a major transshipment area for drugs, including methamphetamine, from Mexico, and currently, the trafficking of meth is a bigger problem for state drug enforcement officials than is meth abuse. In 2003, 155 residents sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 4.0 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment. This is an increase from 2002, when only 71 individuals sought treatment for meth abuse, but a decrease from the late 1990s when more than 200 individuals sought treatment each year. Although the majority of meth seized within the state originates in Mexico, local production of drug by remains high: In 2004, some 120 labs and about 60 kilograms of meth were seized by DEA, state and local authorities, a staggering amount for a state with a population of less than 2 million.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. In addition, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

NEW YORK

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 4

While heroin and cocaine remain bigger drug threats to New York than methamphetamine, indicators suggest than the state's meth problem is on the rise. In 2004, 668 New Yorkers sought treatment for meth addiction (or about 0.2 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment), compared to the 55,230 individuals (or about 19.5 percent) who sought treatment for heroin. However, the number of individuals seeking treatment for a meth addiction has risen steadily, from 547 in 2002 and from 361 in 2000. The market for meth in New York is divided into two camps: New York City users tend to buy the more pure "crystal" meth from West Coast traffickers, and the rural upstate population tends to buy the less pure powder product from local clandestine labs. Seizures of these "mom and pop" style labs have increased remarkably in recent years: from only 2 in 2000 to a high of 73 in 2003, although 2004 recorded only 48 seizures.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. In addition, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

NORTH CAROLINA

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 3

Although not yet as widely available as other illicit drugs, methamphetamine is a growing problem in both the rural and urban areas of North Carolina. In 2003, 283 residents sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 1.0 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment. This is an increase from 2001, when 187 sought treatment, and from 1999, when only 71 did. Similarly, the number of local manufacturers of the drug is also rising: In 2004, a record 318 labs were seized by DEA, state and local authorities, compared to 138 in 2003 and just 14 in 2000. According to drug enforcement officials the surge in meth abuse has contributed to theft and crime in rural areas and has drained local law enforcement resources.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. Also, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General. In addition to the federal minimums, North Carolina state law requires that purchasers of these products be at least 18 years old.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

NORTH DAKOTA

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 38

Methamphetamine is the primary drug of concern in North Dakota, a predominately rural state where meth manufacturers have easy access to anhydrous ammonia, a type of fertilizer that is a key ingredient in meth production. In 2003, 240 residents sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 11.7 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment. Although this is a decrease from 2002, when 377 individuals sought treatment for meth abuse, it is a dramatic increase from 2000 when only 90 did. Local production of methamphetamine also remains high. DEA, state and local officials have seized more than 200 clandestine labs every year since 2002.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. Also, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General. In addition to the federal minimums, North Dakota state law requires that purchasers of these products be at least 18 years old.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

OHIO

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 2

While cocaine is the biggest drug threat in Ohio, methamphetamine abuse and production are increasing. In 2004, some 358 residents sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 0.8 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment. This is a steady increase from 2003, when 282 individuals sought treatment for meth abuse, and from 2000, when only 97 did. Local production of meth is also on the rise: In 2004, 286 meth labs were seized by DEA, state and local authorities, compared to 97 in 2002 and just 29 in 2000.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. Also, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General. In addition to the federal minimums, Ohio state law requires that purchasers of these products be at least 18 years old.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

OKLAHOMA

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 98

Methamphetamine is the primary drug of choice in Oklahoma and the biggest drug threat facing the state. In 2004, 3,869 individuals sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 22.2 percent of all individuals seeking substance abuse treatment. This is an increase from 2002, when 3,457 individuals sought treatment for meth abuse, and from 2000 when 2,582 did. Although Mexican traffickers provide the majority of meth in circulation in Oklahoma, local production has experienced a recent decline: In 2004, 659 labs were seized by DEA, state and local authorities, compared to 894 in 2003.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. Also, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General. In addition to the federal minimums, Oklahoma state law requires that sellers of these products be pharmacists or pharmacy technicians.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

OREGON

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 212

Methamphetamine is currently one of the most widely abused drugs in Oregon, where there are more individuals seeking treatment for a meth addiction per capita than in any other state in the nation. In 2004, 8,561 residents sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 19.0 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment -- more than the number of people seeking treatment for cocaine and marijuana abuse combined. Although this number has decreased from a high of 9,463 individuals in 2002, it has increased from 2000 when 7,665 did. Although Mexican traffickers provide most of the meth in circulation in Oregon, the state is also home to a large number of local clandestine labs. In 2004, DEA, state and local officials seized 472 labs. Similarly, "crystal" meth, the purer, more addictive form of the drug, is becoming increasingly available throughout the state and is the exclusive variety now available in Central Oregon. This type of meth is often taken intravenously and is thought to be the cause of a recent rise in syphilis cases, and state health officials fear it might cause a boom in cases of HIV.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. Also, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General. In addition to the federal minimums, Oregon state law requires that purchasers of these products get a prescription from a doctor.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

PENNSYLVANIA

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 2

While heroin remains the primary drug of choice in Pennsylvania, drug enforcement officials are increasingly concerned about the eastward spread of the meth epidemic, particularly in the rural northwestern corner of the state, which has become known as "the meth capital of Pennsylvania." In 2004, 460 individuals sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 0.5 percent of all individuals seeking substance abuse treatment. This is an increase from 2002, when only 229 individuals sought treatment for meth abuse. Similarly, local production of the drug is on the rise: In 2004 a record 106 labs were seized by DEA, state and local authorities, compared to 60 in 2003 and just 8 in 2000.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. In addition, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

RHODE ISLAND

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 1

Rhode Island's location on the East Coast has, so far, insulated it from the spread of the West Coast's epidemic, and according to drug enforcement officials, methamphetamine is rarely seen in the state. Cocaine is considered the state's biggest drug threat and far eclipses meth. In 2004, 1,601 individuals sought treatment for cocaine addiction (or about 12.5 percent of people seeking substance abuse treatment), while only 13 (or about 0.1 percent) sought treatment for a meth addiction. Similarly, only seven clandestine labs have been seized in the state since 2000. Despite the current lack of symptoms of meth abuse in the state, Rhode Island is not immune to this epidemic; it takes many years before the effects of the drug can be fully measured.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. In addition, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

SOUTH CAROLINA

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 7

While cocaine and marijuana continue to be the major drug problems in South Carolina, the number of clandestine lab seizures and residents seeking treatment for meth addiction continue to rise every year. In 2004, DEA, state and local officials seized 170 meth labs, compared to 42 in 2003 and only 4 in 2000. Similarly, in 2004, 421 residents sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 1.8 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment. This is a dramatic increase from 2002, when only 233 sought treatment for meth abuse, and from 2000, when only 118 did.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. In addition, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

SOUTH DAKOTA

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 75

Methamphetamine abuse is a growing problem in South Dakota, a rural, farming state, where manufacturers of the drug have easy access to large amounts of the ammonia fertilizers necessary for running a meth lab. Although lab seizures have decreased from a high of 38 in 2003, they are still much higher in 2004 (31 seizures) than they were in 2000 (7 seizures). Meanwhile, drug treatment admissions for meth abuse have risen dramatically over the same period. In 2004, 668 residents sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 7.1 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment, compared to 448 in 2002 and only 187 in 2000.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. In addition, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

TENNESSEE

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 5

Methamphetamine is currently gaining in popularity over cocaine in Tennessee, and both lab seizures and drug treatment admissions have skyrocketed in recent years. In 2004, 1,327 clandestine labs were seized by DEA, state and local officials, compared to 822 in 2003 and only 248 in 2000. Tennessee now accounts for 75 percent of the meth lab seizures in the entire southeastern United States. Although fewer residents seek drug treatment for a meth addiction than for a cocaine addiction, their number is on the rise: from only 143 individuals in 2000 to 452 in 2004.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. Also, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General. In addition to the federal minimums, as of March 30, 2005, Tennessee became the first state in the nation to maintain a statewide registry of convicted meth dealers and manufacturers. State law also stipulates that sellers of legal products containing these drugs must be pharmacists or pharmacy technicians.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

TEXAS

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 13

Due to its long border with Mexico, Texas is a major point of entry for Mexican trafficking in cocaine, heroin and methamphetamine: In 2004, state drug enforcement officials reported the second highest amount of seized meth in the nation: 673.5 kilograms. The wide availability of increasingly pure, Mexican-made meth, may explain the recent decrease in the number of small clandestine labs seizures in the state. In 2004, 452 labs were seized by DEA, state and local authorities, compared to 559 in 2002 and 619 in 2001. Although the number of lab seizures has decreased, the number of residents seeking admission for meth addiction has nearly tripled in the past five years: from 1,367 in 2000 to 3,737 individuals (or 10.1 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment) in 2004.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. Also, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General. In addition to the federal minimums, Texas state law requires that purchasers of these products be at least 16 years old.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

UTAH

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 146

Methamphetamine is the primary drug threat in Utah, and more residents seek treatment for meth abuse than any other drug, including alcohol. In 2004, 2,889 individuals sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 26.3 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse drug treatment. Although this is a slight decrease from 2003, when 3,436 individuals sought treatment, admissions for meth addiction have remained in the thousands for the past five years. Although Mexican traffickers provide most of the meth supply in the state (and that supply has increased in purity in recent years), local production appears to be sharply declining: The number of clandestine lab seizures has fallen from a high of 209 in 2000 to only 72 in 2004, and drug enforcement officials report that the labs that have been seized are smaller and more rudimentary than the super labs seized in previous years.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. In addition, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

VERMONT

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 3

Vermont's location in northern New England has, so far, insulated it from the spread of the West Coast's epidemic, and methamphetamine remains an obscure problem in the state. Marijuana is the local drug of choice and far eclipses meth: In 2004, 930 individuals sought treatment for marijuana compared to only 19 individuals for meth. Similarly, only one clandestine lab has been seized in the state since the 1990s. Despite the current lack of symptoms of meth abuse in the state, Vermont is not immune to this epidemic; it takes many years before the effects of the drug can be fully measured.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. In addition, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

VIRGINIA

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 3

Although methamphetamine is not as serious a problem for Virginia as cocaine or heroin, it is quickly making inroads, particularly in the rural Shenandoah Valley region, and the two indicators used to measure the growth of the epidemic, clandestine lab seizures and meth treatment admissions, show increases every year. In 2004, 75 labs were seized by DEA, state and local authorities, compared to 27 in 2003 and just 1 in 2000. In 2004, 545 Virginians sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 0.9 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment, compared to 230 individuals in 2003 and only 86 in 2000.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. In addition, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

WASHINGTON

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 120

Washington is a major entry-point for Canadian imports of pseudoephedrine, the key ingredient used to manufacture methamphetamine, and the state is home to large-scale drug traffickers, who have "flooded" the local market with Mexican-made meth. The state also suffers from a severe problem with clandestine labs, although the number of lab seizures has decreased in recent years from 1,478 in 2001 to 947 in 2004. Meanwhile, meth is the most widely abused illicit drug in the state, and the number of individuals seeking treatment for meth addiction has increased in recent years from 6,919 in 2000 to 9,362 in 2004, or about 16.1 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. Also, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General. In addition to the federal minimums, Washington state law requires that purchasers of these products be at least 18 years old.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

WEST VIRGINIA

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 1

Methamphetamine, a drug known to hit rural areas the hardest, is a major problem in the largely rural state of West Virginia. According to drug enforcement officials, clandestine lab activity has "increased threefold in the past several years." In 2004, 165 labs were seized by DEA, state and local authorities, compared to 64 in 2003 and just 3 in 2000. Unfortunately, it is difficult to know the full scope of West Virginia's struggle with meth since drug treatment admissions data for the state is incomplete; however, it appears that the number of persons seeking treatment for meth addiction has gone down in recent years: from 72 in 2001 to 8 in 2002 and 21 in 2003.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. Also, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General. In addition to the federal minimums, West Virginia state law requires that purchasers of these products be at least 18 years old and stipulates that sellers be pharmacists or pharmacy technicians.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

WISCONSIN

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 4

Recently, the rural communities in western Wisconsin have begun to feel the westward spread of the meth epidemic, although the drug has not yet made inroads to the state's larger cities. In 2004, only 259 residents sought treatment for meth addiction or about 1.1 percent of all individuals seeking treatment for substance abuse. However, the number of individuals seeking treatment for meth has risen nearly 50 percent each year for the past several years, from 70 in 2000 to 160 in 2002 and to 238 in 2003. Although most of Wisconsin's meth is manufactured outside of the state, drug enforcement officials have reported an overall decline in the number of local lab seizures: from 101 in 2003 to 78 in 2004.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. Also, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General. In addition to the federal minimums, Wisconsin state law requires that purchasers of these products be at least 18 years old. State law also stipulates that sellers must be pharmacists or pharmacy technicians.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

WYOMING

Meth treatment admissions per 100,000 residents (2003): 178

In recent years, methamphetamine has become the illegal drug of choice in Wyoming, and it is now the state's biggest drug threat. Meth arrests now exceed all other drug arrests combined, and more residents seek treatment for meth addiction than for any other drug except alcohol. In 2004, 878 residents sought treatment for meth addiction, or about 17.6 percent of all persons seeking substance abuse treatment. This is a steady increase from 2002, when 691 residents sought treatment for meth abuse, and from 2000 when only 437 did. On the other hand, local lab seizures are declining: In 2004 only 21 labs were seized by DEA, state and local authorities, compared to 26 in 2003 and 61 in 2002.

Update:The Combat Meth Act, signed by President Bush on March 9, 2006, provides minimum standards for retailers across the country that sell products containing ephedrine and pseudo-ephedrine. The law limits sales to 3.6 grams of the base ingredient (the pure ephedrine or pseudoephedrine) per day and 9 grams per 30 days, and requires that purchasers provide identification and sign a sales log. Also, sellers must now keep these products behind the counter or in a locked case and register on-line with the U.S. Attorney General. In addition to the federal minimums, Wyoming state law requires that purchasers of these products be limited to 3 grams per transaction and be in possession of no more than 15 grams at a time.

Sources: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Episode Date Set, and the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.

 

 

A Note on Sources: This map was created using the most recent state information available on meth use and production provided by the 2005 Drug Enforcement Administration state factsheets, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Treatment Episode Data Set, and from FRONTLINE research into state laws regulating ephedrine and pseudoephedrine, including a list of recently enacted legislation compiled by the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws. Special thanks to Steve Suo of The Oregonian for the use of his collected meth statistics.

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